2015 WebMD Health Hero Bennet Omalu, MD

Bennet Omalu, MD, accepts the award for 2015 WebMD Health Hero, Scientist at this year’s awards gala November 5, 2015, at the Times Center in New York City.

Omalu’s research uncovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a disorder caused by repeated brain injuries, and he linked it to the physical trauma that certain former NFL players endured. His work has transformed the way we look at — and play — football. Still, he remains humble. “I don’t want to be glorified. I don’t want to be placed on any pedestal. I’m just a simple man who wanted to make other people happy.”

Source by [author_name]

WebMD (Business Operation),Health Heroes,Bennet Omalu,CTE,chronic traumatic ecephalopathy,National Football League (Sports Association),brain injury,Football (Interest),American Football (Sport),Health (Industry),NFL,Concussion (Disease Or Medical Condition)

Nutrition Therapy and Crohn’s Disease

 

What Is Nutrition Therapy?

Nutrition therapy is way to treat health conditions or their symptoms with a special diet. Sometimes, nutrition therapy is used instead of standard treatments, such as medicine. A doctor or registered

can create these diets.

Nutrition therapy is also called medical nutrition therapy.

What Is Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Crohn’s Disease?

Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes

of the intestines. Enteral (EN-tur-ul) nutrition therapy uses a drinkable
formula, such as Boost or Pediasure, to control inflammation and promote healing in Crohn’s disease.

Why Is Enteral Nutrition Therapy Done for Crohn’s Disease?

Enteral nutrition therapy is an alternative to steroids and other medicines that ease the symptoms of Crohn’s disease. Steroids can have serious side effects, including poor growth and increased chance of infections.

Enteral nutrition therapy can help improve nutrition and growth, ease inflammation, and heal the gastrointestinal tract (or “gut”).

How Does Enteral Nutrition Therapy Work?

The two types of nutrition therapy used to manage Crohn’s symptoms are:

  • exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), also called total enteral nutrition (TEN): Formula is used for all meals. Plain water and some other liquids may be allowed.
  • partial enteral nutrition (PEN): Some food is allowed along with the formula. This makes the diet easier to follow.

Some kids drink the formula, while others get it through a nasogastric (NG) tube that runs from the nose into the stomach.

Enteral nutrition therapy helps improve nutrition for people with Crohn’s disease. But it’s not clear why and how it works. Providing balanced nutrition with these formulas might give the gut a chance to heal. It may also work by changing the mix of

that live in the gut. Good bacteria in the gut can help protect the intestinal lining and regulate the immune system.

How Long Do People Need Enteral Nutrition Therapy?

Kids with Crohn’s disease will need to follow this diet for at least 8–12 weeks. Enteral nutrition therapy can begin at the time of diagnosis or during flare-ups (when symptoms get worse). This is called induction therapy. Its goal is to relieve symptoms.

What Happens After Enteral Nutrition Therapy?

After induction therapy, food is slowly added to the child’s diet. The amount of formula decreases as more food is given.

When symptoms are under control, you’ll make a plan with your child’s doctor to help keep symptoms under control and prevent flare-ups. On maintenance therapy, your child may:

  • have a balance of regular food, special diets, and formula
  • take maintenance medicines

Your child’s doctor and dietitian will help you choose the diet that works best for your child.

Are There Any Risks From Enteral Nutrition Therapy?

Enteral nutrition therapy is very safe. But it can be hard for kids and teens to stick with the diet because:

  • They have to drink the same thing every day without much variety. Allowing some food may help to keep kids on the diet.
  • The formula might cause stomach upset, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Children with Crohn’s disease may become malnourished because:

  • belly pain, nausea, and other problems decrease their appetite
  • the body needs more calories, especially during flare-ups
  • digestion is poor and nutrients aren’t absorbed

Not eating enough food or getting enough nutrients from food can lead to poor growth. So doctors check all children with Crohn’s disease for malnutrition.

Children with severe malnourishment have shifts in fluids and electrolytes during nutrition therapy. Rarely, this can lead to a problem called refeeding syndrome, which causes:

  • irregular heartbeats
  • breathing problems
  • seizures

To help prevent this, these children get enteral nutrition therapy in a hospital, where the care team can watch them closely.

Source link

Freezing Heart Muscle – Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic cardiologist Fred Kusumoto, M.D., discusses cryoablation for treatment of atrial arrhythmia. To learn more or to request an appointment, please visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/atrial-fibrillation/home/ovc-20164923?mc_id=global&utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=sm&utm_content=dysrhythmiaheart&utm_campaign=mayoclinic&geo=global&placementsite=enterprise&cauid=103944. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heart rate that can increase the risk of other heart-related complications. Symptoms of atrial fibrillation include dizziness, shortness of breath, and fatigue. Atrial fibrillation also increased the risk of stroke. A new treatment used at Mayo Clinic called cryoablation can aid in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. During the procedure a catheter is inserted into the area of the heart with the arrhythmia and a balloon is deployed freezing the area causing the atrial fibrillation.

source

How Can Exercise Lower Your Blood Sugar?

How does regular exercise keep your blood sugar in check? Learn to control your blood sugar.

Subscribe to WebMD here: https://www.youtube.com/user/WebMD

Follow WebMD here:
Website: http://webmd.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WebMD/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/webmd/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/WebMD
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/webmd/

Source by [author_name]

exercise,blood sugar,diabetes,insulin,working out with diabetes,animation

Immunotherapy Expands Lung Cancer Treatment Options

 

April
27, 2018, by NCI Staff

Immune checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies (Ab) that block PD-1 proteins target immune cells in the lymph nodes and immune and cancer cells in tumors.

Credit: adapted from Int J Clin Oncol. 2016. doi: 10.1007/s10147-016-0959-z. CC BY 4.0

For some patients who are newly diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer, the combination of a treatment that helps the immune system to fight cancer—an immunotherapy—and chemotherapy may help them to live longer than chemotherapy alone, according to the results of a large clinical trial.

In the trial, patients with metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received the drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda) plus chemotherapy had improved overall survival and progression-free survival compared with patients who received chemotherapy alone.

After a median follow up of 10.5 months, patients who received pembrolizumab were 51% less likely to die than patients who received chemotherapy alone. After 12 months, an estimated 69.2% of patients in the pembrolizumab–chemotherapy combination group, but only 49.4% of those in the chemotherapy group, were still alive.

Pembrolizumab is one of a class of immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.

The results, from the KEYNOTE-189 clinical trial, were presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Chicago on April 16 and published concurrently in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the combination of pembrolizumab and chemotherapy for some patients with NSCLC. But the treatment has not been widely adopted, in part because the trial that led to its approval was a small phase 2 study, said Roy Herbst, M.D., Ph.D., of the Yale Cancer Center.

Clinicians have been waiting for the results of the phase 3 trial, noted Dr. Herbst, who discussed the KEYNOTE-189 trial during a plenary session at the AACR meeting. “And these results have exceeded all expectations.”

He and other experts at the meeting predicted that the pembrolizumab–chemotherapy combination would now be commonly used as the initial treatment for certain patients.

“This study represents a total change in the way we approach the treatment of patients with metastatic lung cancer,” said the trial’s lead investigator, Leena Gandhi, M.D., Ph.D., of the Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health.

A New Treatment Option

In the clinical trial, more than 600 patients were randomly assigned to receive either a standard chemotherapy regimen alone or the chemotherapy regimen plus pembrolizumab—both as an initial treatment for 3 months and as an extended, or maintenance, treatment.

Patients were eligible for the trial if they had not been treated previously for advanced lung cancer and if their tumors lacked mutations in the ALK or EGFR genes. (Effective targeted therapies exist and are the standard of care for patients whose tumors have ALK or EGFR mutations.)

Merck, which manufactures pembrolizumab, funded the trial.

After a median follow-up of 10.5 months, the estimated median overall survival was 11.3 months in the chemotherapy-alone group but was not reached in the pembrolizumab-combination group.

Patients in the trial treated with pembrolizumab also lived longer without their disease progressing, with a median progression-free survival of 8.8 months versus 4.9 months in patients treated only with chemotherapy.

The addition of the immunotherapy drug to chemotherapy did not substantially increase side effects, Dr. Gandhi noted. However, more patients receiving pembrolizumab experienced a sudden change in kidney function, a condition known as acute kidney injury (5.2% in the pembrolizumab-combination group versus 0.5% in the chemotherapy-alone group).

Patients receiving the combination therapy—and especially patients who may be at risk for kidney problems—should be monitored closely for side effects, noted Arun Rajan, M.D., who studies lung cancer in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research and was not involved in the study.

Testing a Combination of Immunotherapy Drugs

“This is a new era for non-small cell lung cancer,” Dr. Herbst said. The new results, he went on, build on decades of advances in treating lung cancer that began with chemotherapy, continued with targeted therapies, and have led, most recently, to immunotherapies.

But, despite this progress, many patients with metastatic lung cancer who initially respond to these treatments experience a recurrence, Dr. Herbst continued. “We’re doing well, but we can do even better by personalizing therapies.”

He noted that another clinical trial presented at the meeting (and published in the New England Journal of Medicine) could help move the field in this direction by providing information about a potential biomarker of response to immunotherapy called tumor mutational burden. This measurement is an assessment of the number of genetic mutations in a tumor.

The trial, CheckMate-227, included a comparison of the combination of two checkpoint inhibitorsnivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy)—versus chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC who had not previously received chemotherapy for their disease. Lung tumors were also assessed for tumor mutational burden.

Of the 1,004 patients for whom information on tumor mutational burden was available, 444 were found to have a high mutational burden. Among this group, the estimated 1-year progression-free survival rate was 42.6% with nivolumab plus ipilimumab versus 13.2% with chemotherapy. After a minimum follow-up of 11.5 months, patients who received the immunotherapy combination were 42% less likely to have their cancer progress or to die than those in the chemotherapy group.

Among patients with a low tumor mutational burden, progression-free survival was similar between the combination-immunotherapy group and the chemotherapy group. The rates of treatment-related side effects were similar between the two groups.

Matthew Hellmann, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center presented results from the study, which was supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Ono Pharmaceutical, in Chicago.

Although longer follow-up is needed to assess whether combination immunotherapy extends overall survival compared with chemotherapy, Dr. Rajan said the ipilimumab–nivolumab combination “could be a potential treatment option for patients with NSCLC who have high tumor mutational burden, lack targetable genomic changes, and wish to avoid chemotherapy altogether.”

Identifying New Molecular Subtypes of Lung Cancer

“This study builds on the progress we’ve made in precision medicine for lung cancer and validates tumor mutational burden as a biomarker,” said Dr. Hellman.

Both studies collected information on a different biomarker of potential response to checkpoint inhibitors—the levels of a protein called PD-L1 on tumor cells.

In CheckMate-227, patients with high tumor mutational burden benefited from the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab regardless of PD-L1 level. In KEYNOTE-189, patients with high and low PD-L1 levels benefited from the pembrolizumab combination, “but there was increasing benefit with increasing levels of PD-L1,” said Dr. Gandhi.

She stressed the importance of learning more about how to “differentiate patients” and predict responses to immunotherapies. “PD-L1 could be part of that effort,” she added.

Both KEYNOTE-189 and CheckMate-227 increase “our understanding of the distinct molecular subtypes of lung cancer,” Dr. Hellmann said. “They are a huge step forward.”

To continue this progress, Dr. Herbst encouraged physicians to enroll their patients in clinical trials, including those in NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network, so that researchers can learn more about the distinct molecular subtypes of lung cancer and how to treat the disease.

This will take time, he added in an interview later. “We spent 20 years personalizing targeted therapies, and we are now moving toward personalized immunotherapies,” he said.

Source link

Al Errato’s Mayo Clinic Story

Al Errato tells the story of his wife Mary’s treatment at Mayo Clinic for complications from an amputation she had at another medical facility, and his perspective on what makes Mayo Clinic unique.

source

Should You Pop a Zit?

Tempted to pop that annoying zit? See what happens when you do, and why your best bet is to leave it be.

Source by [author_name]

WebMD,health,acne,zits,pop zit,should you pop a zit,why you shouldn’t pop a zit,squeeze zit,pus,blackhead,acne scar,zit,skin problems,skin

WHO Says Childhood Obesity Among Most Serious Health Challenges this Century

The World Health Organization made this assertion in an assessment published March of 2012.  Childhood obesity is certainly a growing epidemic in the United States. According to the CDC, it affects more than 30 percent of children, making it the most common chronic health concern for the young. This number has more than tripled in the US since the 1970’s, and, if current trends continue, more than half of all children in the US today will be characterized as obese as an adult.

Obesity can harm nearly every system in a developing body – heart and lungs, muscles and bones, kidneys and digestive tract, as well as the hormones that control blood sugar and puberty.  It can also take a heavy social and emotional toll that is incalculable.   Medical experts say youth who are overweight or obese have substantially higher odds of remaining so into adulthood, increasing their risk of disease and disability later in life.

WARNING:  Those with patterns of disordered eating may be triggered by this article, and there are certainly strong opinions associated with the word obesity and anyone being characterized as “obese”.

Childhood Obesity Statistics

Globally, an estimated 43 million preschool children (under age 5) were overweight or obese in 2010, a 60 percent increase since 1990. The problem affects countries rich and poor, and by sheer numbers, places the greatest burden on the poorest.  Of the world’s 43 million overweight and obese preschoolers, 35 million live in developing countries. By 2020, if the current epidemic continues unabated, 9 percent of all preschoolers will be overweight or obese – nearly 60 million children.

Here in the United States, childhood obesity has increased nearly 3-fold since 1980, and today, the country has some of the highest obesity rates in the world. One out of six children is obese, and one out of three is overweight or obese. Though the overall U.S. child obesity rate has held steady since 2008, some groups have continued to see increases, and some groups have higher rates of obesity than others.  For children and adolescents aged 2-19 years:

  • The prevalence of obesity was 18.5% and affected about 13.7 million children and adolescents.
  • Obesity prevalence was 13.9% among 2- to 5-year-olds, 18.4% among 6- to 11-year-olds, and 20.6% among 12- to 19-year-olds. Childhood obesity is also more common among certain populations.
  • Hispanics (25.8%) and non-Hispanic blacks (22.0%) had higher obesity prevalence than non-Hispanic whites (14.1%).
  • Non-Hispanic Asians (11.0%) had lower obesity prevalence than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics.
  • The prevalence of obesity decreased with increasing level of education of the household head among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years.
  • Obesity prevalence was 18.9% among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years in the lowest income group, 19.9% among those in the middle income group, and 10.9% among those in the highest income group.
  • Obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group among non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic boys.
  • Obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic girls. Obesity prevalence did not differ by income among non-Hispanic black girls.

How Childhood Obesity is Measured

A child is described as “affected by obesity” if their body mass index-for-age (or BMI-for-age) percentile is greater than 95 percent. A child is described as “overweight” if their BMI-for-age percentile is greater than 85 percent and less than 95 percent.

Measuring Weight Status

Obesity in children is determined by using BMI-for-age percentiles. BMI-for-age percentiles have emerged as the favored method to measure weight status in children. This method calculates your child’s weight category based on age and BMI, which is a calculation of weight and height. However, it should be kept in mind that this method, among other methods, should be used as a tool, and only a physician can best determine and diagnose weight status in your child.

Measuring Growth in Children

You may have heard your pediatrician refer to your child’s weight in terms of a percentile. To measure growth in your child based on their weight, doctors most commonly use weight-for-age percentiles. Weight-for-age percentiles are used to measure your child’s weight based strictly on age. It does not take into account the height of a child. This is not a method to determine obesity (or overweight) in children, but simply an indicator of growth as compared to children of the same age.

For example, if your child is in the 95th percentile, this means that their weight is greater than 95 percent of children of the same age.

About Body Mass Index (BMI)

BMI is the most common method to measure adult obesity. However, BMI is now becoming a popular tool, which is combined with BMI-for-age percentiles, used to measure obesity in children. BMI is a number calculated by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by his or her height in meters squared.

It should be noted, again, BMI is one simple measure that may or may not correlate with true health.  Other measures, such as actual metabolic scores and grip strength may be better indicators of overall health.

Risks Associated with Childhood Obesity

Children who are considered affected by obesity are 70 percent more likely to continue being affected by obesity into adulthood. In addition, they are at greater risk for serious medical issues such as:

  • Heart disease
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Cancer

Aside from the clinical perspective, children who are affected by obesity face social discrimination, leading to low self-esteem and depression.

Causes of Childhood Obesity

Although the causes of childhood obesity are widespread, certain factors are targeted as major contributors to this epidemic. Causes include:

  • Environment
  • Microbiome
  • Lack of physical activity
  • Heredity and Family
  • Dietary Patterns
  • Socioeconomic status

Environment

Today’s environment plays a major role in shaping the habits and perceptions of children and adolescents. The prevalence of television commercials promoting unhealthy foods and eating habits is a large contributor. In addition, children are surrounded by environmental influences that demote the importance of physical activity.

Today, it is estimated that approximately 40 to 50 percent of every dollar that is spent on food is spent on food outside the home in restaurants, cafeterias, sporting events, etc. In addition, as portion sizes have increased, when people eat out they tend to eat a larger quantity of food (calories) than when they eat at home.

Beverages such as soda and juice boxes also greatly contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic. It is not uncommon for a 32-ounce soda to be marketed toward children, which contains approximately 400 calories. The consumption of soda by children has increased throughout the last 20 years by 300 percent. Scientific studies have documented a 60 percent increase risk of obesity for every regular soda consumed per day. Box drinks, juice, fruit drinks and sports drinks present another significant problem. These beverages contain a significant number of calories and it is estimated that 20 percent of children who are currently overweight are overweight due to excessive caloric intake from beverages.

Microbiome

Recent studies indicate weight gain trajectories in early childhood are related to the composition of oral bacteria of two-year-old children, suggesting this understudied aspect of a child’s microbiota –  the collection of microorganisms, including beneficial bacteria, residing in the mouth –  could serve as an early indicator for childhood obesity. A study describing the results appears September 19 in the journal Scientific Reports. [1]

Lack of Physical Activity

Children in today’s society show a decrease in overall physical activity. The growing use of computers, increased time watching television and decreased physical education in schools, all contribute to children and adolescents living a more sedentary lifestyle.

Another major factor contributing to the childhood obesity epidemic is the increased sedentary lifestyle of children. School-aged children spend most of their day in school where their only activity comes during recess or physical education classes. In the past, physical education was required on a daily basis. Currently, only 8 percent of elementary schools and less than 7 percent of middle schools and high schools have daily physical education requirements in the U.S.

Heredity and Family

Science shows that genetics play a role in obesity. It has been proven that children with parents affected by obesity are more likely to be affected as well. Estimates say that heredity contributes between 5 to 25 percent of the risk for obesity.

However, genes alone do not always dictate whether a child is affected by excess weight or obesity. Learned behaviors from parents are a major contributor. Parents, especially of those whose children are at risk for obesity at a young age, should promote healthy food and lifestyle choices early in their development.

Dietary Patterns

Over the past few decades, dietary patterns have changed significantly. The average amount of calories consumed per day by has dramatically increased. Furthermore, the increase in caloric intake has also decreased the nutrients needed for a healthy diet.

Food portions also play an important role in the unhealthy diet patterns that have evolved. The prevalence of “super size” options and “all you can eat” buffets create a trend in overeating. Combined with a lack of physical activity, children are consuming more and burning off less.

Socioeconomic Status

Children and adolescents that come from lower-income homes are at greater risk of being affected by obesity. This is a result of several factors that influence behaviors and activities.

Lower-income children cannot always afford to partake in extracurricular activities, resulting in a decrease in physical activity. In addition, families who struggle to pay bills and make a living often opt for convenience foods, which are higher in calories, fat and sugar.

Educational levels also contribute to the socioeconomic issue associated with obesity. Parents with little to no education have not been exposed to information about proper nutrition and healthy food choices. This makes it difficult to instill those important values in their children.

What to do about Treating Childhood Obesity

Treating obesity in children and adolescents differs from treatment in adults. Involving the family in a child’s weight management program is a key element to treatment. As a support system, family is integral in ensuring all health goals, not just weight, are met.

It is important to talk with your physician about options for treating childhood obesity. The various treatments of obesity in children and adolescents include:

  • Diet therapy
  • Physical activity
  • Behavior Modification
  • Surgery

Diet Therapy

When treating a child or adolescent affected by obesity, it is often recommended they have a consultation with a nutritionist that specializes in children’s needs. Nutritionists can best help children understand healthy eating habits and how to implement them in their long-term diet.

In some cases, nutritionists do not always recommend restricting caloric intake for children. Education on how to read food labels, cut back on portions, understand the food pyramid and eat smaller bites at a smaller pace is generally the information given to change a child’s eating habits.

The goal should be to enjoy a balanced and nutritious diet and have an appropriate level of physical activity to promote overall health and well-being.

Physical Activity

Another form of treatment of obesity in children is increasing physical activity. Physical activity is an important long-term ingredient for children, as studies indicate that inactivity in childhood has been linked to a sedentary adult lifestyle.

Increasing physical activity can decrease, or at least slow the increase, in fatty tissues in children affected by obesity. The US Surgeon General recommends that children get at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Individualized programs are available and possible for those children or adolescents that are not able to meet minimum expectations.

Behavior Modification

Lifestyles and behaviors are established at an early age. It is important for parents and children to remain educated and focused on making long-term healthy lifestyle choices.

There are several ways that children and adolescents can modify their behavior for healthier outcomes, such as: changing eating habits, increasing physical activity, becoming educated about the body and how to nourish it appropriately, engaging in a support group or extracurricular activity and setting realistic weight management goals.

Surgery

While surgery has been performed on adolescents in extreme cases to treat obesity, it is only considered for those with severe medical conditions that can only be improved through such intervention.

Get Connected

Everyday, you can find physicians in your area who are looking for new and unique ways to connect and collaborate with you on your care and the wellness of your family.  You might find them in HealthLynked – the first of its kind social ecosystem designed to truly allow patients and physicians to engage online in ways never before possible.

If you have a loved one facing the challenges of Childhood Obesity, or any other health concern, find help by getting Lynked.  Go to HealthLynked.com to sign up for free and start taking control of your family’s health.

 

Adapted from:

ObesityAction.org

Harvard.edu

CDC.gov

References:

[1]  Sarah J. C. Craig, Daniel Blankenberg, Alice Carla Luisa Parodi, Ian M. Paul, Leann L. Birch, Jennifer S. Savage, Michele E. Marini, Jennifer L. Stokes, Anton Nekrutenko, Matthew Reimherr, Francesca Chiaromonte, Kateryna D. Makova. Child Weight Gain Trajectories Linked To Oral Microbiota CompositionScientific Reports, 2018; 8 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31866-9

 

Type B Thoracic Aortic Dissection: When to Intervene

In this roundtable discussion originally posted on Medscape Cardiology, Mayo Clinic Cardiology, Cardiac Surgery, and Vascular Surgery specialists Robert D. McBane, M.D., Randall R. De Martino M.D., Thomas C. Bower, M.D., and Alberto Pochettino, M.D., discuss when to intervene in Type B thoracic aortic dissection cases.

source

Stroke Facts | cdc.gov

 

Stroke mortality map.The country’s highest death rates from stroke are in the southeastern United States.2

Find facts and statistics about stroke in the United States.

Stroke Statistics

  • Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 out of every 20 deaths.1
  • Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every 4 minutes, someone dies of stroke.2
  • Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. About 610,000 of these are first or new strokes.2
  • About 185,00 strokes—nearly 1 of 4—are in people who have had a previous stroke.2
  • About 87% of all strokes are ischemic strokes, in which blood flow to the brain is blocked.2
  • Stroke costs the United States an estimated $34 billion each year.2 This total includes the cost of health care services, medicines to treat stroke, and missed days of work.
  • Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability.2 Stroke reduces mobility in more than half of stroke survivors age 65 and over.2

Stroke Statistics by Race and Ethnicity

  • Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death for Americans, but the risk of having a stroke varies with race and ethnicity.
  • Risk of having a first stroke is nearly twice as high for blacks as for whites,2 and blacks have the highest rate of death due to stroke.1
  • Though stroke death rates have declined for decades among all race/ethnicities, Hispanics have seen an increase in death rates since 2013.1

Stroke Risk Varies by Age

  • Stroke risk increases with age, but strokes can—and do—occur at any age.
  • In 2009, 34%of people hospitalized for stroke were less than 65 years old.3

Early Action Is Important for Stroke

Know the warning signs and symptoms of stroke so that you can act fast if you or someone you know might be having a stroke. The chances of survival are greater when emergency treatment begins quickly.

  • In one survey, most respondents—93%—recognized sudden numbness on one side as a symptom of stroke. Only 38% were aware of all major symptoms and knew to call 9-1-1 when someone was having a stroke.4
  • Patients who arrive at the emergency room within 3 hours of their first symptoms often have less disability 3 months after a stroke than those who received delayed care.4

Americans at Risk for Stroke

High blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, obesity, and diabetes are leading causes of stroke. 1 in 3 US adults has at least one of these conditions or habits.

You can take steps to prevent stroke.

More Information

From CDC:

From other organizations:

References

  1. Vital Signs: Recent trends in stroke death rates – United States, 2000-2015. MMWR 2017;66.
  2. Benjamin EJ, Blaha MJ, Chiuve SE, et al. on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2017 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2017;135:e229-e445.
  3. Hall MJ, Levant S, DeFrances CJ. Hospitalization for stroke in U.S. hospitals, 1989–2009. NCHS data brief, No. 95. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2012.
  4. Fang J, Keenan NL, Ayala C, Dai S, Merritt R, Denny CH. Awareness of stroke warning symptoms—13 states and the District of Columbia, 2005. MMWR 2008;57:481–5.

Source link

Top Shaving Tips for Women

Have you nailed down a shaving strategy? Or are you still searching for ways to get a smoother, closer shave? Sharpen up your routine with these tips.

Source by [author_name]

WebMD,health,women’s health,shaving,shave legs,tips for smoother skin,razor burn,moisturize skin,exfoliate,sensitive skin,beauty,how to shave