Differentiating Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) from other types of speech sound disorders

Dr. Edythe Strand, Emeritus Professor and Consultant, division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, compares and contrasts CAS with other types of speech disorders, including phonological impairment and dysarthria.

For more information, visit http://mayocl.in/2ifnYX3

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Farsightedness – Genetics Home Reference

 

Farsightedness, also known as hyperopia, is an eye condition that causes blurry near vision. People who are farsighted have more trouble seeing things that are close up (such as when reading or using a computer) than things that are far away (such as when driving).

For normal vision, light passes through the clear cornea at the front of the and is focused by the lens onto the surface of the , which is the lining of the back of the eye that contains light-sensing cells. Some people who are farsighted have eyeballs that are too short from front to back. Others have a cornea or lens that is abnormally shaped. These changes cause light entering the eye to be focused too far back, behind the retina instead of on its surface. It is this difference that causes nearby objects to appear blurry. In a person with this condition, one eye may be more farsighted than the other.

If it is not treated with corrective lenses or surgery, farsightedness can lead to eye strain, excess tearing, squinting, frequent blinking, headaches, difficulty reading, and problems with hand-eye coordination. However, some children with the eye changes characteristic of farsightedness do not notice any blurring of their vision or related signs and symptoms early in life. Other parts of the visual system are able to compensate, at least temporarily, for the changes that would otherwise cause light to be focused in the wrong place.

Most infants are born with a mild degree of farsightedness, which goes away on its own as the eyes grow. In some children, farsightedness persists or is more severe. Children with a severe degree of farsightedness, described as high hyperopia, are at an increased risk of developing other eye conditions, particularly “lazy eye” (amblyopia) and eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus). These conditions can cause significant visual impairment.

In general, older adults also have difficulty seeing things close up; this condition is known as . Presbyopia develops as the lens of the eye becomes thicker and less flexible with age and the muscles surrounding the lens weaken. Although it is sometimes described as “farsightedness,” presbyopia is caused by a different mechanism than hyperopia and is considered a separate condition.

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What is Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura ?

Our six year old came in from playing on a warm summer’s day.  She seemed her normal, happy and carefree self, but when she jumped into my lap, I noticed dime sized bruises all over her legs, evenly spaced.  It looked odd to say the least, and she couldn’t say anything had happened, so we called the clinic to discuss with the on duty nurse.

“So, you have an active 6 year old with bruises on her legs; doesn’t seem like a big deal to me,” was her response.  After sharing with the nurse I didn’t think she quite understood, which she agreed – at least she couldn’t understand the worry in my voice – she asked we bring her in….

We found out she had Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HEN-awk SHURN-line PUR-pu-ruh) – a disorder that causes inflammation and bleeding in the small blood vessels in your skin, joints, intestines and kidneys.  While this is not ITP, it was our introduction to the words purpura, platelets and thrombocytopenia.

September is National ITP Awareness Month

Chronic ITP and platelet function disorders are perhaps the most common bleeding disorder. It affects both sexes and all ages and races. While we don’t know for sure, there are an estimated 120,000 persons with ITP in the United States. That’s more than 10 times the number of people with Hemophilia!

The purpose of ITP awareness month is to increase the public’s awareness and understanding of ITP and to let patients and families know that there are resources and support available to help them have the best possible outcomes. Patients and families are not alone.

What is ITP?

Platelets are relatively small, irregularly shaped components of our blood. They are required to support the integrity of our blood vessel walls and for blood to clot. Without enough platelets, a person is subject to spontaneous bleeding or bruising.

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a disorder that can lead to easy or excessive bruising and bleeding. The bleeding results from unusually low levels of platelets — the cells that help blood clot.

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, which is also called immune thrombocytopenia, affects children and adults. Children often develop ITP after a viral infection and usually recover fully without treatment. In adults, the disorder is often long term.

If you don’t have signs of bleeding and your platelet count isn’t too low, you may not need any treatment. In rare cases, the number of platelets may be so low that dangerous internal bleeding occurs. Treatment options are available.

Symptoms

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) may have no signs and symptoms. When they do occur, they may include:

  • Easy or excessive bruising (purpura)
  • Superficial bleeding into the skin that appears as a rash of pinpoint-sized reddish-purple spots (petechiae), usually on the lower legs
  • Bleeding from the gums or nose
  • Blood in urine or stools
  • Unusually heavy menstrual flow

Causes

In some people thrombocytopenia is caused by the immune system mistakenly attacking and destroying platelets. If the cause of this immune reaction is unknown, the condition is called idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Idiopathic means “of unknown cause.”

In most children with ITP, the disorder follows a viral illness, such as the mumps or the flu. It may be that the infection triggers the immune system malfunction.

Increased breakdown of platelets

In people with ITP, antibodies produced by the immune system attach themselves to the platelets, marking the platelets for destruction. The spleen, which helps your body fight infection, recognizes the antibodies and removes the platelets from your system. The result of this case of mistaken identity is a lower number of circulating platelets than is normal.

A normal platelet count is generally between 150,000 and 450,000 platelets per microliter of circulating blood. People with ITP often have platelet counts below 20,000. Because platelets help the blood clot, as their number decreases, your risk of bleeding increases. The greatest risk is when your platelet count falls very low — below 10,000 platelets per microliter. At this point, internal bleeding may occur even without any injury.

Risk factors

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura can occur in anyone at almost any age, but these factors increase the risk:

  • Your sex. Women are two to three times more likely to develop ITP than men are.
  • Recent viral infection. Many children with ITP develop the disorder after a viral illness, such as mumps, measles or a respiratory infection.

Complications

Spontaneous bleeding can also occur in mucous membranes inside the mouth or in the gastrointestinal tract. ITP is often accompanied by fatigue and sometimes depression.

A rare complication of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura is bleeding into the brain, or disruptive bleeding into internal organs, which can be fatal.

Pregnancy

In pregnant women with ITP, the condition doesn’t usually affect the baby. But the baby’s platelet count should be tested soon after birth.

If you’re pregnant and your platelet count is very low, or you have bleeding, you have a greater risk of heavy bleeding during delivery. In such cases, you and your doctor may discuss treatment to maintain a stable platelet count, taking into account the effects on your baby.

When to see a doctor

Make an appointment with your doctor if you or your child develop symptoms that worry you.

Bleeding that won’t stop is a medical emergency. Seek immediate help if you or your child experiences bleeding that can’t be controlled by the usual first-aid techniques, such as applying pressure to the area.

The best way to find a physician to talk to you about abnormal bleeding or bruising is to search online through the large data base at HealthLynked.  We are connecting physicians and patients in new ways so they can more closely collaborate on care and wellness.

Ready to get Lynked?  Go to HealthLynked.com to get started, today, for free!

 

 

WebMD Animation: White House Garden

From the WebMD Archives:

First Lady Michelle Obama describes the White House garden to a young girl in the audience at WebMD’s town hall, “Simple Tips for Healthy Families.” Watch the garden come to life in this fun animated short for families to enjoy!

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White House,First Lady,Michelle Obama,White House Garden,American Grown,childhood obesity,gardening

Talking to Your Kids About STDs

 

Talking to Your Kids About STDs

It is important for parents to talk to their kids and teens about STDs (sexually transmitted diseases). Your kids need to understand how STDs spread and how to protect themselves.

What Are STDs?

STDs (also called sexually transmitted infections, or STIs) are infections that spread through sex (vaginal, oral, or anal). Some STDs can spread through close contact with the genitals or body fluids.

Does Talking About Sex and STDs Make Teens More Likely to Have Sex?

Talking to kids and teens about sex and STDs does not make it more likely that they’ll have sex. But if they do become sexually active, they will understand the risks and know how to protect themselves.

When Should I Talk to My Kids About STDs?

Talking about STDs and other personal subjects like sex and puberty shouldn’t be one big talk at a particular age. Instead, start the conversation early, and slowly build on your child’s understanding. By about 10–13 years old, most kids understand what sex is and are ready to learn about STDs.

But even if your child is older and you haven’t started talking about STDs, it’s not too late to have the conversation. A late talk is better than no talk at all.

How Do I Bring Up the Subject of STDs?

Sometimes it can be hard to find the right time to talk about STDs. A good time to start the conversation might be:

  • if your child asks questions about sex
  • during a TV show or movie that shows a romantic relationship. You might ask, “What sorts of things do people in a relationship need to think about?”
  • when your child gets the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. You could say, “This shot protects you from a type of STD. Do you know what an STD is?”

What Should I Talk About?

Talk about the types of STDs:

Cover these key points:

  • STDs mainly spread through sex. But some STDs can spread through close contact with someone’s genitals or body fluids.
  • The best way to completely prevent an STD is to not have sex (oral, vaginal, or anal). If someone decides to have sex, using a latex condom every time can prevent most STDs.
  • Some people with an STD have discharge from the vagina or penis, or sores in the genital area.
  • Some people with an STD have no signs or symptoms. Even then, a person can spread the infection to a sexual partner.
  • If someone has an STD and does not get treatment, it can lead to medical problems such as long-term pain and trouble getting pregnant later.
  • Antibiotics can cure some STDs (like chlamydia and gonorrhea). But some STDs (like herpes or HIV) have no cure.
  • You can get an STD the very first time you have sex.

Where Can We Get More Information About STDs?

You can get reliable information about STDs at:

What if I Have Trouble Talking to My Kids About STDs?

If you don’t feel comfortable talking with your kids about STDs, make sure they can turn to someone else for accurate information. This could be a doctor or

, counselor, school nurse, teacher, or a trusted family member.

Kids and teens need to know about STDs. It’s best if they get the facts from someone reliable.

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Asthma: Diagnosing, Treating and Managing this Condition – Mayo Clinic

Arveen Thethi, M.D., an asthma and allergy specialist at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., shares information about the chronic condition asthma, which affects more than 235 million people, according to the World Health Organization.

Asthma is a treatable — but not curable — condition that causes inflammation, mucus and spasms in the small airway. It affects both children and adults and is characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing, which vary in severity and frequency from person to person.

Dr. Thethi shares information about diagnosis, management and treatment of the disorder, including when to seek care from a specialist.

More information about asthma and services at Mayo Clinic can be found at http://mayoclinic.org/asthma

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12 Proven Ways a Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine Can Help

Chiropractic came into being on this day in 1895 — a time when confusion about health was widespread.  Tools in conventional medicine were scant. The famous Flexner Report[1] had not yet been commissioned, and health care in the U.S. in general could only be classified as dismal (at best) or futile (at worst).

Fast forward to today.  123 years later, much has been learned about how the body works and how we can heal it.  Still, many do not understand the benefits of non-traditional medical care and how it serves in keeping one well.

If you frequently deal with symptoms like joint pain, backaches or headaches and have yet to visit a chiropractor for help, you may be missing out on an effective and natural treatment option. Millions of people around the world have experienced the incredible benefits of chiropractic care — a holistic, non-invasive treatment approach proven to help treat dozens of different conditions.  One of the best things about receiving chiropractic adjustments is that they are a completely drug-free path to healing the body naturally.

Despite its growing popularity, there are still a lot of misconceptions about the field of chiropractic care, including how the practice works and how chiropractors are trained. Below, you’ll learn more about the philosophy, history and evidence-based research behind chiropractic care — shedding light on why studies have proved, objectively and subjectively, that chiropractic patients commonly experience “overall increased bodily function”.

What Are Chiropractic Adjustments?

What is the meaning of chiropractic? There are a number of chiropractic definitions depending on who you ask. According to the World Federation of Chiropractic, the meaning of chiropractic medicine is:

A health profession concerned with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, and the effects of these disorders on the function of the nervous system and general health. There is an emphasis on manual treatments including spinal adjustment and other joint and soft-tissue manipulation.

Here’s another chiropractic definition, this time according to the Association of Chiropractic Colleges:

Chiropractic is a healthcare discipline that emphasizes the inherent recuperative power of the body to heal itself without the use of drugs or surgery. The practice of chiropractic focuses on the relationship between structure (primarily the spine) and function (as coordinated by the nervous system) and how that relationship affects the preservation and restoration of health. In addition, Doctor of Chiropractic recognize the value and responsibility of working in cooperation with other health care practitioners when in the best interest of the patient.

Indeed, chiropractic can be a complementary medicine as most chiropractors are used to working with medical doctors to get people pain-free and avoid future injuries.

How Chiropractic Treatments Work:

Most of the benefits associated with chiropractic care are from patients receiving specific chiropractic adjustments. Chiropractic adjustments work by helping to place your body in the proper position that then allows the body to heal itself.

Safety is paramount. Indeed, as a holistic and alternative treatment approach, chiropractic adjustments can reduce stress placed on someone’s immune system, freeing up energy to be used towards disease prevention and maintaining homeostasis. Chiropractic care aims to address the whole body, enhancing patients’ ability to think, move and perform.

  • Chiropractors pride themselves on taking a natural, drugless approach to helping their patients reach their health goals. Essentially, the basic principle upon which the entire profession is built is that the body has the amazing, innate ability to heal itself, under the right conditions.  It is the chiropractor’s job to help create an environment that facilitates this inner-healing process and where safety is assured.
  • Because the nervous system controls every cell and organ in your body, chiropractors focus their attention on the health of the spine being properly aligned. If the spine shifts out of its proper place, then adjustments are used to help bring the spine back into alignment.
  • At the core of numerous chiropractic miracle stories is a concept known as “vertebral subluxation.” When chiropractors use this phrase, they refer to mechanical compression and irritation to spinal joints and nerves.

Case in point: the very first chiropractic patient in history was named William Harvey Lillard, who experienced difficulty hearing due to compression of the nerves leading to his ears. He was treated by “the founder of chiropractic care,” David. D. Palmer, who gave Lillard spinal adjustments in order to reduce destructive nerve compressions and restore his hearing. After doing extensive research about physiology, Palmer believed that Lillard’s hearing loss was due to a misalignment that blocked the spinal nerves that controlled the inner ear — an example of vertebral subluxation. Palmer went on to successfully treat other patients and eventually trained other practitioners how to do the same. The first college of chiropractic, founded in 1897, was named after Palmer — the Palmer Chiropractic School & Cure.

Lillard is just one example of a patient who was able to overcome a serious problem in part by receiving targeted chiropractic adjustments. For someone else, it could be that sciatica (nerve pain down the back of their legs) is compromising their quality of life, or for another person, gastrointestinal discomfort. When you consider how most cells and organs in your body are controlled by nerves traveling through your spinal canal, it’s mind-blowing to consider how vast the positive outcomes of realigning these nerves can be.

Complementary treatments to chiropractic include Spinal Decompression Therapy, which involves stretching the spine, using a traction table or similar motorized device, in order to relieve back pain and/or leg pain. Deep tissue massage therapyacupuncture and physical therapy are considered other common complementary therapies.

Why Get Chiropractic Adjustments?

Many things can lead to a vertebral subluxation. Some of the more common causes include:

  • A vertebra going out of place (“misalignment”) because of a slip or fall (i.e., “macrotrauma”).
  • The entire spine misaligning globally due to poor posture.
  • Joint swelling caused by damage done to the intervertebral joint.
  • An inflammatory response caused by a poor diet, lack of pure water or psychological stress.
  • Osteoporosis or degenerative changes of the spine or intervertebral discs.
  • Trigger points and tight back muscles that pull the vertebrae out of place.

Importance of Having Good Posture:

The problem in Western cultures is that our unnatural habit of sitting down all day does damage to our spine and posture. Today, it’s common to spend hours sitting while being glued to a cell phone, iPad or laptop. Few people take the time each day to properly stretch, fix their posture or engage in enough physical activity.

The “hunched over” lifestyle that is all too popular today causes straining on the neck, due to a condition called “forward head posture.” Studies prove that for every inch your head sticks out from its true center of gravity, your neck bears an extra 10 pounds of stress!

During posture evaluations, chiropractors regularly observe many of their patients carrying their head two to three inches forward, which is an extra 20–30 pounds of pressure on their neck. Just think about how dangerous this can be for the health of someone’s spine, and how this straining then spills over to many other parts of the body.

Top 12 Benefits of Chiropractic Adjustments

Finding a good chiropractor isn’t only key to correcting the damage caused by years of poor posture or trauma — it’s also important for everyone wanting to take a proactive approach to protecting his or her health. It’s hard to find any other profession on the planet that can prevent neuromuscular-based disease like chiropractic can.

Are you experiencing frequent negative health symptoms like back pain, headaches, or stress? Pain medications can only do so much, and they won’t fix your problem.

Visiting a chiropractor may be able to help you overcome some or all of your symptoms. The adjustments you receive can have a myriad of positive benefits without the stress or invasiveness of surgery or other more intense techniques.

Is a chiropractic adjustment right for you? Consider some of the top benefits of getting a chiropractic adjustment.

  1. Blood Pressure

In 2007, George Bakris, the world expert on hypertension, published a study with a team of researchers in the Human Journal of Hypertension showing that one upper cervical chiropractic adjustment had the same effect as two blood pressure-lowering drugs. Even more fascinating, the effects of just one adjustment lasted more than six months!

Compared to the placebo-treated patients, those who got the real procedure saw an average 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure count) and an average 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom blood pressure number). (11)

Other studies have shown similar findings with hypotensive patients, and their low blood pressure was raised to normal levels after chiropractic care. This is exciting — it highlights the body’s ability to create a homeostatic balanced environment once vertebral subluxations are removed.

High blood pressure medications can have negative side effects including:

Fatigue

Nausea

Dizziness

Anxiety

Weight loss

If an adjustment can give similar, if not the same, effect as these types of medications, it might be something to consider.

  1. A Chiropractic Adjustment Can Help With Neck and Lower Back Pain

This benefit is probably the most well known when it comes to going to the chiropractor. 80% of all Americans experience some sort of lower back pain in their lifetime.

Medications and surgeries are options for this type of pain, but those can be dangerous, expensive, and ineffective.

An adjustment from chiropractor services can significantly reduce your back and neck pain via a non-invasive technique. Chiropractic treatment is also cheaper than other methods of back pain management.

One study involving chiropractic patients with neck pain found that 96 percent of respondents indicated that they were either “Very satisfied” or “Satisfied” with the chiropractic care they received, and that 98 percent said that they “Definitely would” or were “Very likely” to choose chiropractic care again if they experienced a similar problem.

In a 2003 study published in the British Medical Journal, 183 patients with neck pain were randomly allocated to receive either manual therapy (spinal mobilization), physiotherapy (mainly exercise) or general practitioner care (counseling, education and drugs) over the course of a 52-week period. The clinical outcome measures showed that chiropractic adjustments resulted in faster recovery than physiotherapy and general practitioner care. Moreover, total costs of the chiropractic-treated patients were about one-third of the costs of physiotherapy or general practitioner care.

Another study published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics found patients with chronic low-back pain treated by chiropractors showed greater improvement and satisfaction one month following treatment compared to patients treated by family physicians. Satisfaction scores were higher for chiropractic patients, as a higher proportion of chiropractic patients (56 percent vs. 13 percent in the physician group) reported that their low-back pain was better or much better. Nearly one-third of medical patients reported their low-back pain was actually worse or much worse following treatment. Other studies have shown comparable results; the majority of acute and chronic chiropractic patients experience better outcomes in pain, functional disability and patient satisfaction following treatment.

In a study funded by NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, conducted to test the effectiveness of different approaches for treating neck pain, 272 participants were divided into three groups: those that received either spinal manipulative therapy from a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC), those who received pain medications (over-the-counter pain relievers, narcotics and muscle relaxants), and those only following at-home exercise recommendations. After 12 weeks, about 57 percent of those who met with DCs, and about 48 percent of those who exercised, reported at least a 75 percent reduction in pain. As a comparison, 33 percent of the people in the medication group reported decreased pain. After one year, approximately 53 percent of the two drug-free groups (chiropractic and exercise) continued to report at least a 75 percent reduction in pain, compared to an average of just 38 percent pain reduction among those who only took medication.

  1. Scoliosis

Scoliosis is a condition where there is an abnormal curvature of the spine. This can cause pain, abnormal posture, a reduction in your range of motion, and even trouble breathing.

Most scoliosis patients have few options for treatment. But a chiropractic adjustment has been shown to help treat scoliosis patients.

Chiropractic treatment combined with physical therapy could help treat and prevent the progression of scoliosis. The effectiveness of this treatment option varies from patient to patient, but it is a viable option.

  1. Sciatica

Sciatica refers to pain that radiates from your lower back down your legs because of a damaged or pressured sciatic nerve.

This type of chronic pain can lead to over-medicating and chronic pain. Chiropractic treatment can help relieve pressure on the sciatic nerve that is causing your sciatica. Studies show that patients receiving adjustments reduced the number of pain days they had. They also experienced a reduction in the severity of their pain.

  1. Reduce Inflammation

Inflammation is one of the top causes of pain, joint issues, and tension. Chronic inflammation has been linked to a number of diseases like heart disease, chronic pain, and cancer.

Chiropractic adjustments have been shown to reduce inflammation, which can lead to a number of positive benefits, including:

Chronic lower back pain relief

Reduced muscle tension

Relief of joint pain

Reduced inflammation can also help reduce your risk of developing diseases that are linked to high inflammation.

  1. Headache Relief

Both tension and migraine headaches can be caused by back pain and spinal issues. Back misalignment can cause muscle tension and pain which can result in both tension headaches as well as migraine headaches.

Second only to back pain, headaches — both tension headaches and migraine headaches — are one of the most common conditions regularly managed by chiropractors. Over 230 peer-reviewed articles referenced chiropractic’s ability to help cure, prevent and ease the burden of headaches and migraines in people all across the globe!

A group trial found that 22 percent of people who had chiropractic treatment saw the number of attacks drop by 90 percent. In that same study, 49 percent said they had a significant reduction in pain intensity. Compared to most medical treatments, few interventions can initiate headache relief naturally, without the risks of taking drugs long-term, like chiropractic adjustments can. (7)

  1. Improvement in Symptoms of Neurological Conditions

Chiropractic adjustments have been shown to help increase blood flow to the brain. They can help increase the flow of cerebral spinal fluid as well. This can significantly help people suffering from neurological conditions like multiple sclerosis and epilepsy.

While this subject is still being researched, the potential therapeutic applications provide exciting possibilities of treatment for these patients.

  1. Children’s Health Benefits

Kids chiropractic care can significantly improve certain conditions that affect children. The big three conditions that can be helped with an adjustment in children are colic, acid reflux, and ear infections.

Colic

Colic causes near constant crying and fussiness in young children and babies as a result of abdominal discomfort and gas. Colic can be extremely difficult to treat, which can result in an uncomfortable baby and exhausted parents.

Adjustments have been shown to help improve infantile colic symptoms.

Acid Reflux and Ear Infections

It’s thought that the nerves in the brain and back along with the nerves in the gut and head are particularly sensitive. When these are affected, it can result in conditions like acid reflux and ear infections.

A chiropractic adjustment can help to improve what’s known as the gut-brain connection, which is why chiropractic adjustments might help these types of conditions.

This improvement can also boost the immune system, which can help prevent infection.

  1. Improved Athletic Performance

Reduction of inflammation, pain, and other similar conditions can help get the body in top shape. This is especially true for athletes who depend on their body to do their job.

Many sports teams and professional athletes hire chiropractors. Adjustments can reduce pain and tension caused by sports and activity. Alignments can also reduce inflammation and boost the immune system to help enhance an athlete’s performance.

  1. Vertigo

Dizziness and vertigo can make it impossible to do everyday tasks or even get up out of bed without feeling disoriented and nauseous. This is a common condition after experiencing a head or neck injury.

A chiropractic adjustment can help target joints and vertebrae that aren’t moving correctly. This could help reduce vertigo episodes. An adjustment can also help fix your body’s natural balance, which can also cause vertigo if it’s misaligned.

  1. Surgery Prevention

Chiropractic has long been heralded by natural health care providers as a method to prevent back surgery. In fact, the Journal of the American Medical Association just recently published its low back pain guidelines and suggested that people suffering from back pain first try chiropractic before resorting to surgery.

  1. Frozen Shoulder

In 2012, a clinical trial [2] was published describing how patients suffering from the debilitating condition frozen shoulder responded to chiropractic care.  Of the 50 patients: 16 resolved completely; 25 showed 75 percent to 90 percent improvement; eight showed 50 percent to 75 percent improvement; and one showed 0 percent to 50 percent improvement. Before chiropractic treatment the patients reported a median initial pain score of 9 out of 10, with a range of 7 to 10. But after treatment the median score dropped down to 2, with a range of 0 to 10.

Additional Chiropractic Benefits

While the benefits mentioned above might draw the most patients to visit chiropractors, there are also many more reasons why chiropractic care is such a valuable treatment approach. Additional benefits of chiropractic adjustments include helping to treat:

  • Back pains due to pregnancy
  • Osteoarthritis and joint pain
  • Asthma and other respiratory issues
  • ADHD
  • Anxiety, due to adjustments activating the parasympathetic nervous system
  • Reduced range of motion, trouble with flexibility and fibromyalgia
  • Bell’s Palsy
  • Insomnia and trouble sleeping, which can be tied to pain, anxiety or trouble breathing properly

Chiropractic History & Interesting Facts

Although it’s been practiced for nearly 120 years, chiropractic care has become much more popular and accessible over the past three decades. While chiropractic has typically been thought of as an “alternative” or “complimentary” offering, it’s now more mainstream than ever before — indicated by the fact that chiropractors are licensed in all 50 states of the U.S, recognized in many other countries, included in many insurance plans, and generally given the same standing as doctors and nurses.

The man who is considered the “godfather” of chiropractic is D.D. Palmer, who was the first person to make the claim that abnormalities of the spine were the root causes of many diseases. In the 1890s, Palmer began treating patients with a combination of hands-on adjustments, along with energetic/spiritual healing. Palmer treated his very first patient named Harvey Lillard, who suffered from impaired hearing, by realigning his spine in order to improve communication between his brain and his body.

With an intense interest in medicine, especially bone-setting and manipulations of the neck and back, Palmer went on to teach many others his beliefs and techniques. In 1897, he opened the very first school offering training in chiropractic treatments, called the Palmer School of Chiropractic. Since this time, more than 40 chiropractic schools/colleges have opened in the U.S. enrolling thousands of future Doctors of Chiropractic every year.

DCs must complete four years of doctoral graduate school in order to qualify for exams that must be passed before becoming licensed. Prior to beginning graduate studies in chiropractic training, four years of pre-medical undergraduate college education must be completed.

Precautions Regarding Chiropractic Adjustments

You can rest assure that chiropractic has been shown to be one of the safest treatment approaches in healthcare today, as adjustments are performed very carefully and in a very precise manner. That being said, there some mild side effects following treatment that might occur. These usually go away within 1–2 days and might include temporary discomfort, soreness, stiffness or tenderness in the area of the body where you were adjusted.

Final Thoughts on Chiropractic Benefits

  • Chiropractic adjustments work by helping to place your body in the proper position that then allows the body to heal itself. One of the principles of chiropractic care is realigning the spine thereby reducing pressure placed on sensitive nerves, which can contribute to dysfunction of the central nervous system.
  • Chiropractic can be a complementary medical approach to mainstream medicine as well, and it’s been proven to be one of the safest approaches to naturally and holistically treating patients with a wide range of symptoms or conditions, including: back or neck pain, sciatica, scoliosis, frozen shoulder, acid reflux or digestive issues, headaches, high blood pressure, injuries and neuromusculoskeletal complaints that may require surgery.

How to Find a Chiropractic Doctor

Wondering about chiropractic prices, or whether treatments will be covered by insurance?

The good news is that a written referral is usually not needed to see a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC). You can visit a chiropractor just like you would an MD, as chiropractic care is included in most health insurance plans, including major many medical plans, workers’ compensation, Medicare, some Medicaid plans and Blue Cross Blue Shield plans. You may have to pay a copay and exact prices will depend on your insurance plan, but overall visiting a chiropractor should not be a big expense.

Getting a chiropractic treatment can be a great way to improve multiple areas of your health with one non-invasive treatment. Surgeries and medications can be dangerous and expensive.  With an adjustment, you could safely and easily target your problems.

The best way to find a licensed chiropractic doctor in your area is to either ask someone you know for a referral, including your primary doctor, or to search online through the large data base at HealthLynked.  We are connecting physicians and patients in new ways so that they can more closely collaborate on care and wellness.

Ready to get Lynked and get the kinks out…?  Go to HealthLynked.com to get started, today, for free!

 

Adapted from:

DRAxe.com

dynamicchiropractic.com

usatoday.com

References:

[1] Medical Education in the United States and Canada, Abraham Flexner, 1910, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Menlo Park, California

[2] Murphy FX, Hall MW, D’Amico L, Jensen AM. Chiropractic management of frozen shoulder syndrome using a novel technique: a retrospective case series of 50 patients. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. 2012;11(4):267-272. doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2012.07.001.

Hypothermia – The Basics

Know how to spot hypothermia and what steps to take if someone has it.

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Hyperthyroidism and Graves’ Disease

 

What Is the Thyroid?

The thyroid is a small gland below the skin and muscles at the front of the neck, at the spot where a bow tie would rest.

It’s brownish red, with left and right halves (called lobes) that look like a butterfly’s wings. It weighs less than an ounce, but helps the body do many things, such as get energy from food, grow, and go through sexual development.

What Is Hyperthyroidism?

Thyroid hormone problems happen when the thyroid gland makes either too much or too little hormone for the body.

If the thyroid is overactive, it releases too much thyroid hormone into the bloodstream, causing hyperthyroidism. The body use up energy more quickly than it should, and chemical activity (like metabolism) in the cells speeds up.

If the thyroid is underactive, it makes too little thyroid hormone, causing hypothyroidism. The body uses up energy more slowly, and chemical activity (metabolism) in the cells slows down.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Hyperthyroidism?

High thyroid hormone levels (hyperthyroidism) can cause:

  • nervousness
  • irritability
  • increased sweating
  • bulging eyes
  • trouble sleeping
  • a fast heartbeat
  • irregular menstrual periods in girls
  • weight loss

Sometimes the thyroid gland grows and forms a bulge in the neck called a goiter.

Medicines and other techniques can effectively treat hyperthyroidism. It’s important to work with an

(a doctor who specializes in hormone problems) or other doctor who knows how to treat thyroid conditions.

What Causes Hyperthyroidism?

The three main causes of hyperthyroidism are:

  1. Graves’ disease. This is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children. It happens when the body produces antibodies that make the thyroid gland overactive. Antibodies usually help the body fight infection, but these antibodies stop the body from controlling the thyroid gland correctly (like a car without brakes). As a result, the thyroid hormone levels in the blood can get very high. Doctors don’t know why the body starts making these antibodies. Graves’ disease can affect health for the rest of a person’s life. So it’s important to get medical treatment to control it.
  2. Thyroid gland inflammation (thyroiditis). This causes the thyroid gland to leak too much thyroid hormone into the blood. Thyroiditis can be caused by a lots of things — for example, a blow to the thyroid gland, infections, and
    diseases (like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis). Hyperthyroidism from thyroiditis usually lasts for a few months and then gets better on its own. The thyroid usually recovers, but sometimes is damaged and can’t work normally again. This causes hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid).
  3. Thyroid nodules (growths in the thyroid gland). These can sometimes make large amounts of thyroid hormones, causing symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Overactive thyroid nodules are usually large (an inch or more in size) and can be big enough to feel in the neck. Most overactive thyroid nodules are
    and treated with surgery.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Graves’ Disease?

Kids and teens with Graves’ disease might notice that:

  • they’re more tired than usual
  • they have lots of trouble sleeping
  • they lose weight
  • their heart is beating very fast
  • their hands shake (called tremor)
  • they have a lot of trouble focusing

Girls with Graves’ disease sometimes notice that they have fewer (or less regular) menstrual cycles. Over time, many people notice that their thyroid glands are enlarged.

Some people with Graves’ disease have troubles with their eyes — itching, burning, redness, and sometimes trouble seeing normally. Sometimes they feel pressure behind the eyes, feel their eyes bulging, or see double. This is because the antibodies that make the thyroid overactive also cause

and swelling behind the eyes. When this happens, it’s called Graves’ eye disease.

How Is Graves’ Disease Diagnosed?

Graves’ disease is diagnosed based on a visit with a doctor who will review the symptoms and examine the patient.

It’s important to do lab tests too, because many people can have some of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism for other reasons. Sometimes the blood tests aren’t enough to be sure of the diagnosis and other tests are needed, like a thyroid scan or ultrasound.

How Is Graves’ Disease Treated?

Doctors usually treat Graves’ disease with anti-thyroid medicines. These medicines slow the release of thyroid hormones from the gland. They usually bring hormone levels down to normal within a couple of months.

Many people with Graves’ disease need to take anti-thyroid medicines for a long time to control the condition — sometimes for the rest of their lives.

Some might need other treatment if anti-thyroid medicines don’t help or cause side effects, or if the disease is very hard to control. In these cases, two permanent treatment options can be used: radioactive iodine treatment and surgery.

Radioactive iodine (RAI) is the most commonly used permanent treatment for Graves’ disease. RAI damages the thyroid gland so that it can’t make too much thyroid hormone. This doesn’t harm other parts of the body. The RAI treatment is taken in capsules or mixed with a glass of water. The thyroid gland quickly absorbs the RAI from the bloodstream and, within a few months, the gland shrinks and symptoms slowly disappear.

Surgery to remove most of the thyroid gland is called a thyroidectomy. It’s done in a hospital under general anesthesia, so the person is asleep and feels nothing. A small incision (cut) in the lower central part of the neck usually leaves a thin scar. It’s common to have some pain for a few days after the surgery, but most people feel much better within a few days.

After treatment for hyperthyroidism, hormone production often slows down to hypothyroid (underactive) levels. So the person needs to take a thyroid hormone replacement tablet each day. This treatment is a lot easier to manage than taking pills to control the hyperthyroidism — fewer blood tests, doctor visits, and medicine changes are needed.

As the body adjusts to the hormone replacement tablets, a doctor may increase or reduce the dosage until the levels of thyroid hormone are normal. When the doctor finds the proper dosage, people usually feel well and free of symptoms. The doctor will continue to check hormone levels to make sure the dosage is right, especially for growing teens whose levels might change over just a few months.

What Else Should I Know?

We don’t know why people develop Graves’ disease. But with good medical help, kids and teens can be healthy and do all the things other kids and teens can do.

Graves’ eye disease can develop at any time in someone who has Graves’ disease. Smoke can make this eye disease much worse, so it’s very important to not smoke and to avoid secondhand smoke.

Women with Graves’ disease need to be very careful to keep their hormone levels in balance. Uncontrolled thyroid hormone levels in a pregnant woman can lead to problems during pregnancy and harm her baby.

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New Esophageal Cancer Treatment-Mayo Clinic

Cancer of the esophagus is like many other types of cancer. It’s often curable if caught early. Treatment for esophagus cancer, even in the early stage, has traditionally been surgery — removal of the entire esophagus. But now, doctors at Mayo Clinic are using minimally invasive endoscopies to treat early cancers. Patients have the procedure and go home the very same day.

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The Basics: Blood Donation

Want to give blood? Find out what your need to do before, during, and after donating.

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Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

 

What Is the Thyroid?

The thyroid is a small gland below the skin and muscles at the front of the neck, at the spot where a bow tie would rest.

It’s brownish red, with left and right halves (called lobes) that look like a butterfly’s wings. It weighs less than an ounce, but helps the body do many things, such as get energy from food, grow, and go through sexual development. In younger children, it is also important for brain development.

What Is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism (or underactive thyroid) is when the thyroid gland doesn’t make enough of some important hormones. This makes the body use up energy more slowly, and chemical activity (metabolism) in the cells slows down.

Hypothyroidism is a common condition, especially in adult women. But kids can have it too. Some children are born with it — this is called congenital hypothyroidism. Others develop it later, usually late in childhood or as teens. The most common cause of hypothyroidism in kids and teens is the

disease Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Hypothyroidism?

A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, it might cause no symptoms at all.

But if thyroid hormone levels get too low, symptoms can become more obvious. These include:

  • sluggishness
  • depression
  • dry skin or hair loss
  • feeling cold
  • muscle weakness
  • poor memory or trouble concentrating
  • constipation
  • facial puffiness
  • weight gain (even when not eating more or exercising less)
  • slowed growth
  • slow sexual development
  • irregular menstrual periods in girls

What Is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (hah-she-MOE-toes thy-roy-DYE-tiss) is an autoimmune disease. It causes most cases of hypothyroidism in kids and teens. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is also called
lymphocytic thyroiditis.

What Happens in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an ongoing condition in which the immune system attacks the thyroid. Often, this prevents the thyroid from making enough thyroid hormone, causing hypothyroidism. The body responds by sending a message to the thyroid to work harder to make enough hormone.

This, and the swelling the immune system causes as it attacks the gland, can make the thyroid get bigger, leading to a goiter. The thyroid can keep changing size over months or years. Surgery is sometimes done to treat goiters, especially if the thyroid is big enough to cause problems with swallowing. But this is rarely needed in children.

How Are Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Diagnosed?

To diagnose hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, doctors ask about a person’s symptoms, do a physical exam, and order blood tests. The tests measure:

  • thyroid hormone levels, particularly thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH is a hormone made in the
    (a pea-sized gland just beneath the brain). More TSH is released into the blood when the brain and pituitary sense that the levels of thyroid hormone in the blood are too low. TSH stimulates the thyroid to work harder to make more thyroid hormone.
  • some antibodies (proteins made by the immune system). High levels of these antibodies in the blood are a sign that the gland is being attack by the immune system in Hashimoto’s. The two antibodies commonly measured are thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO).

How Are Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis Treated?

Doctors treat an underactive thyroid with daily thyroid hormone replacement pills. These will bring the body’s levels of thyroid hormone back to normal.

This treatment is fairly simple, but a person will have doctor visits several times a year for an exam, blood tests, and medicine changes as needed.

What Else Should I Know?

In rare cases, the immune system of a child with Hashimoto’s can cause

in the brain and nervous system. Symptoms can include strange behavior, confusion, muscle twitching, and seizures.

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