Examples of different levels of severity in Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

Dr. Edythe Strand, Emeritus Professor and Consultant, division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, differentiates CAS from other speech disorders. Video examples are used to show different levels of severity.

For more information, visit: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/childhood-apraxia-of-speech/basics/definition/con-20031147?mc_id=us&utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=sm&utm_content=video&utm_campaign=mayoclinic&geo=national&placementsite=enterprise&cauid=100504

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Transforming Lives with 3D Printing – Future of Health

Cutting edge 3D printing is reshaping care for patients with missing limbs by providing custom prosthesis that help them live a more fulfilling lives. Advancements in 3D printing, regenerative medicine, and bioprinting are poised to save thousands of people in the coming years. See the full report: http://wb.md/1FNPUoW

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Stem Cell Transplantation as a Treatment for Multiple Myeloma – Mayo Clinic

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, which are found in the bone marrow or blood-producing tissue that fills spaces within the bones. In this video, Mayo Clinic hematologist Dr. David Dingli explains the role stem cell transplants play in treating multiple myeloma and the process patients can expect to undergo.

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Your Baby’s Growth in the First Trimester

From a fertilized egg to a garlic-bulb-sized baby, here’s how your growing little one develops week-to-week through the first trimester.

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Neutropenia – Mayo Clinic

Dr. Carola Arndt, a Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist at Mayo Clinic, shares an overview of Neutropenia, an abnormally low count of neutrophils, white blood cells that help the immune system fight off infections. Dr. Arndt discusses symptoms, causes, diagnoses, and treatment options.

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Type 2 Diabetes 101

Why is type 2 diabetes so devastating to the body?

Get reliable information about type 2 diabetes, tips from diabetes experts, and real-life stories about people living with type 2 diabetes.
http://diabetes.webmd.com/type-2-diabetes-tv/default.htm

Reviewed By: Varnada Karriem-Norwood, August 2012
SOURCES: National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2007. C. Ronald Kahn, MD Vice Chair, Joslin Diabetes Center.
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Flu and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) – Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic doctors say its very important to get flu shots. Not just because they protect you against influenza, but also because if you do get sick with the flu, the vaccine reduces your chances of developing a potentially deadly complication called Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Hear one patient’s story of being on a ventilator for almost two months after developing ARDS.

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5-Minute Cool Down

Follow this simple post-workout routine to cool off and recover from your workout.

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Facts | Stillbirth | NCBDDD

 

The loss of a baby due to stillbirth remains a sad reality for many families and takes a serious toll on families’ health and well-being. Learn more about stillbirth below.

Family grieving the loss of a baby due to stillbirth

What is stillbirth?

A stillbirth is the death or loss of a baby before or during delivery. Both miscarriage and stillbirth describe pregnancy loss, but they differ according to when the loss occurs. In the United States, a miscarriage is usually defined as loss of a baby before the 20th week of pregnancy, and a stillbirth is loss of a baby after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Stillbirth is further classified as either early, late, or term.

  • An early stillbirth is a fetal death occurring between 20 and 27 completed weeks of pregnancy.
  • A late stillbirth occurs between 28 and 36 completed pregnancy weeks.
  • A term stillbirth occurs between 37 or more completed pregnancy weeks..

Stillbirth: A Healthcare Professional’s Role

Image of PDF Factsheet - Stillbirth: A Healthcare Professional's Role

How Many Babies Are Stillborn?

Stillbirth effects about 1% of all pregnancies, and each year about 24,000 babies are stillborn in the United States.1 That is about the same number of babies that die during the first year of life and it is more than 10 times as many deaths as the number that occur from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).2

Because of advances in medical technology over the last 30 years, prenatal care (medical care during pregnancy) has improved, which has dramatically reduced the number of late and term stillbirth.3 However, the rate of early stillbirth has remained about the same over time.3

What Increases the Risk of Stillbirth?

The causes of many stillbirths are unknown. Therefore, families are often left grieving without answers to their questions. Stillbirth is not a cause of death, but rather a term that means a baby’s death during the pregnancy. Some women blame themselves, but rarely are these deaths caused by something a woman did or did not do. Known contributors to stillbirth generally fall into one of three broad categories:

  • Problems with the baby (birth defects or genetic problems)
  • Problems with the placenta or umbilical cord (this is where the mother and baby exchange oxygen and nutrients)
  • Certain conditions in the mother (for example, uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure, or obesity)

Stillbirth with an unknown cause is called “unexplained stillbirth.” Having an unexplained stillbirth is more likely to occur the further along a woman is in her pregnancy.

A somber couple holding one another

Although stillbirth occurs in families of all races, ethnicities, and income levels, and to women of all ages, some women are at higher risk for having a stillbirth. Some of the factors that increase the risk for a stillbirth include the mother:

  • being of black race
  • being a teenager
  • being 35 years of age or older
  • being unmarried
  • being obese
  • smoking cigarettes during pregnancy
  • having certain medical conditions, such as high blood pressure or diabetes
  • having multiple pregnancies
  • having had a previous pregnancy loss

These factors are also associated with other poor pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth.

State laws require the reporting of fetal deaths, and federal law supports national collection and publication of fetal death data. The National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) released the first ever report on cause of fetal death using national data in 2016.

What can be done?

CDC works to learn more about who might have a stillbirth and why. CDC does this by tracking how often stillbirth occurs and researching what causes stillbirth and how to prevent it. Knowledge about the potential causes of stillbirth can be used to develop recommendations, policies, and services to help prevent stillbirth. While we continue to learn more about stillbirth, much work remains. To learn more about CDC’s activities, visit the Stillbirth CDC Activities page.

References

  1. Macdorman MF, Gregory ECW. Fetal and perinatal mortality, United States, 2013. National vital statistics reports; vol 64 no 8. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015. [Read report]
  2. Xu JQ, Kochanek KD, Murphy SL, Arias E. Mortality in the United States, 2012. NCHS data brief, no 168. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2014. [Read report]
  3. MacDorman MF, Kirmeyer SE, Wilson EC. Fetal and perinatal mortality, United States, 2006. National vital statistics reports; vol 60 no 8. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2012. [Read data brief]

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