Osteosarcoma-Mayo Clinichttps://www.healthlynked.com/2018/08/12/osteosarcoma-mayo-clinic/

Dr. Carola Arndt discusses osteosarcoma which is one of the most common malignant tumors of bone in teenagers and young adults. It has an incidence of 5.6 per million in children under 15 in the U.S. Dr. Arndt also discusses diagnoses, evaluation, and treatment of osteosarcoma. Treatment for osteosarcoma at Mayo Clinic is a multidisciplinary teamwork approach. Additionally, Dr. Arndt discusses Mayo Clinic’s membership in the Children’s Oncology group as well as EURAMOS (European and American Osteosarcoma Study Group).

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Managing Celiac Disease-Mayo Clinic

Wheat is the grain on which Western civilization was built. It’s been used for thousands of years as the foundation of our diet. But 1 out of 100 Americans has a condition called celiac disease, which is an intolerance to wheat, barley and rye. Its symptoms can be subtle, but if you don’t stick to a gluten-free diet you could be damaging your body and not even know it. More from Mayo Clinic.

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Drug Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis



Eric Matteson, M.D., a rheumatologist at Mayo Clinic, discusses some of the different drugs used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Recognizing and Treating Whooping Cough



While the bacterial infection can be mild in adults, if a baby who hasn’t received a full course of vaccinations is infected, whooping cough can be extremely serious.Mayo Clinic News Network reporter Vivien Williams has more on how to recognize and treat this disease.

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Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Defining, Screening, Treating



In a video originally posted on TheHeart.org | Medscape Cardiology, Sharonne Hayes, MD, and Regis Fernandes, MD, discuss the genetic disorder of familial hypercholesterolemia and appropriate steps for identifying and treating the disease.

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Speech Disorder Called Apraxia can Progress to Neurodegenerative Disease: Dr Joseph Duffy



It may start with a simple word you can’t pronounce. Your tongue and lips stumble, and gibberish comes out.

Misspeaking might draw a chuckle from family and friends. But, then, it keeps happening. Progressively, more and more speech is lost. Some patients eventually become mute from primary progressive apraxia of speech, a disorder related to degenerative neurologic disease.

Two Mayo Clinic researchers have spent more than a decade uncovering clues to apraxia of speech. Keith Josephs, M.D., a neurologist, and Joseph R. Duffy, Ph.D., a speech pathologist, will present “My Words Come Out Wrong: When Thought and Language Are Disconnected from Speech” on Sunday, Feb. 14, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

In this video Dr. Duffy discusses the disorder.

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Treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)



Dr. Edythe Strand, Emeritus Professor and Consultant, division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, discusses basic approaches to treatment of CAS, providing a number of video examples of therapy.

For more information, visit http://mayocl.in/2ifnYX3

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Autonomic Dysfunction and Concussion – Mayo Clinic



David Dodick, M.D., Brent Goodman, M.D., and Bert Vargas, M.D., neurologists at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, discuss study findings presented at the 2013 American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting. Currently, there is no biomarker or diagnostic test to both reliably indicate when a brain concussion has occurred and when the brain has recovered. The study results indicate that autonomic nervous dysfunction is common in concussion and autonomic nervous system testing may be a sensitive biomarker in patients with concussion.

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Epididymovasostomy – Mayo Clinic

In this video, Epididymovasostomy a more complex vasectomy reversal is explained.

For questions about costs and insurance, call the Mayo Clinic Business Estimating Office:
– Within the United States: 507-284-0403

To schedule a consultation for vasectomy reversal, please contact:
– Within the United States: 507-538-5363
– Outside of the United States: 507-284-8884
or email at: intl.mcr@mayo.edu

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