How to Ease Arthritis Foot Pain | WebMD

Try these tips to ease the pain and swelling that can come with arthritis in your feet — and make sure you’re picking the right shoes.

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Mysterious Symptoms and then…Diagnosis: Still’s Disease

For many months, Bethany Pautsch’ symptoms were a mystery to the doctors she was seeing in Chicago. When she was told she would need a hip replacement without knowing the cause of the symptoms and deterioration of her joints, she came to Mayo Clinic, where a doctor quickly diagnosed her as having: Still’s Disease. Listen to her explain how this diagnosis and subsequent treatment have changed her life…

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Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Search for a Cure

 

NIH studies look for new medications and improved outcomes

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a tricky disease.

No one knows what causes it, but while there isn’t yet a cure for the autoimmune disease, it can be treated. Arthritis is an extremely common problem but not all forms of arthritis are alike.

Just as symptoms of RA can vary, medical treatments can vary, but the important thing to know is that over the last 20 years the treatment of RA has changed dramatically with the approval of many new, highly effective drugs.

These can help slow or stop joint damage, minimize disability, and reduce inflammation, pain and swelling. Lowering, stress, eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking, and getting enough rest are all suggested lifestyle changes.

Some medicines are taken by mouth, while others require regular injections; these drugs are highly effective, but do have side effects. Thus, it’s essential to get a proper diagnosis from a doctor who specializes in rheumatic diseases, understands all the different causes of arthritis—in adults and children—and has experience with the new drugs, advises John O’Shea, M.D., scientific director at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).

“RA and other autoimmune diseases don’t just affect the joints, they cause inflammation throughout your body,” Dr. O’Shea says.

The main goal in treating RA is to reduce inflammation and pain, stop more joint damage, and to be able to function normally.

“We now have better treatment therapies to keep you safe, as well as clinical studies that specifically look at inflammation,” Dr. O’Shea adds. The RA drug tofacitinib, approved for the treatment of RA in 2012, targets a protein that was discovered in the early 1990s by O’Shea and his colleagues.

Dr. O’Shea and his team at NIAMS are studying the molecular and genetic basis of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases in an effort to identify potential strategies for future therapies.

Researchers are also studying the natural history of the disease in children and adults to understand more fully how RA progresses and impacts people’s lives.

In addition, NIAMS researchers are collaborating with investigators outside of NIH to explore whether people with RA who are in remission (no symptoms of the disease) while taking TNF inhibitors are at risk of having symptoms come back if they stop taking the medicine.

Another study funded by NIAMS focuses on RA patients with inflammation in the blood vessels and heart tissue, which can eventually lead to heart disease.

“People who have rheumatoid arthritis have a 50 percent increase in chance of experiencing a stroke or heart failure,” says Joan Bathon, M.D., chief of the division of rheumatology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York.

Known as the TARGET study, the clinical trial aims to see if treatment of arthritis in individuals with RA will also reduce inflammation in blood vessels. Inflammation in blood vessels is believed to be an early predictor of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) which leads to heart attacks and strokes. If RA medications reduce inflammation in blood vessels, this may reduce future chances of heart attacks and strokes. “We want to aggressively treat rheumatoid arthritis, to see if it will help the heart,” Dr. Bathon says.

Joining a clinical study such as the TARGET study will help researchers find a cure more quickly. There are 30 sites in the U.S. focusing on the TARGET study, with more to come soon.

“We have a lot of treatments, but none of our treatments cure the disease,” Dr. Bathon says. “In lieu of a cure is prevention of related complications from the disease. RA is treatable. We’re focusing on outcomes right now and getting people with RA back on track.”

The bottom line: If you have symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, early diagnosis is essential. It is critical to get aggressive treatment as early as possible to help slow RA and help prevent permanent joint damage.

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Matt Iseman: Rheumatoid Arthritis Warrior

 

Emmy-winning ‘American Ninja Warrior’ host opens up about health, career, and NIH research

Photo: courtesy of NBC.

Matt Iseman was trained as a doctor, but he is known to many as a comic, first winner of the “New Celebrity Apprentice,” and host of the hit TV show “American Ninja Warrior.” He is also one of millions of Americans living with arthritis and has been an advocate for more research into the condition. He spoke with NIH MedlinePlus magazine to talk about his experience and what drives him to success.

Tell us about your experience with rheumatoid arthritis.

I was diagnosed Christmas of 2002. When I was told I had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the first thought I had was relief. People are always shocked when they hear that. But it had been 18 months that I had been having symptoms—18 months when my body and my life were falling apart.

What was it like at first?

I had just turned 30 and my symptoms started with pain in my right index finger and then spread to my feet, back, and neck. I was always exhausted and often sleeping up to 14 hours a day. I had been an athlete all my life, but couldn’t work out at all and eventually gained 55 pounds. I saw a range of doctors, but no one could tell me what was wrong.

When I was finally told I had RA, I was relieved because I knew there was something I could do about it.

I’m walking proof of the importance of research like that done by NIH.

What’s the good news?

The good news is when I started treatment (with a biologic medicine that helps reduce inflammation), it gave me my life back.

That is why I have been a passionate advocate, working with groups like the Arthritis Foundation to let others know that there is hope. Despite the fact that I am a doctor and understood the disease, I didn’t know anyone who had it. Many who are newly diagnosed go online and see the worst-case scenario.

I want them to see me, someone who won “Celebrity Apprentice,” who hosts “American Ninja Warrior,” and travels the country doing stand-up comedy. I love sharing my story. There is hope. This is a disease you can lead a full life with.

What do you do to keep up your health and energy?

I used to play basketball, but I haven’t played basketball or run since I was diagnosed. I like to tell people that whatever you are dealing with, don’t focus on what you can’t do, focus on what you can do. You will be amazed at what you can accomplish.

I have discovered yoga and pilates. They are terrific for building strength and flexibility. If you are dealing with RA, the saying goes “motion is lotion.” The more you move the better you feel and the better your vitality.

Laughter has always been key for me, particularly when I was down before I was diagnosed. Stand-up comedy really saved my life at that point. No matter how bad I felt, I did stand-up comedy, laughing and making others laugh. Taking care of yourself physically and emotionally is key. And laughter is such a great tool.

What about the importance of having a strong support community?

No one does it alone. We talk about that on “American Ninja Warrior” and I talk about arthritis.

When you are newly diagnosed, your doctor, your nurse, and your family are going to talk to you. But it is also important to talk to someone who is going through or has been through what you are. Join a group to share stories and tips about living with RA.

NIH supports a great deal of research aimed at improving treatments for arthritis. Would you speak to the importance of this research?

I’m it. I’m walking proof of the importance of research like that done by NIH. The medication I’m on was discovered just four years before I was diagnosed.

We would not have advancements like this without the research supported by NIH. We need to make sure that researchers have the funding to develop even better treatments and one day find a cure.

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Could Your Kid’s Growing Pains Be Something More?

When you think about arthritis and its associated swelling and joint pain, you likely relate the problem primarily with the elderly. However, statistics are clear it is not just the oldest (and wisest) among us who suffer from arthritis; there’s a whole range of problems under the Juvenile Arthritis (JA) umbrella negatively impacting the lives of kids, according to the Arthritis Foundation.

July is Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month, a month dedicated to increase awareness about the early signs and symptoms of juvenile arthritis and to increase the focus and expand resources for the fight against JA. The campaign was initiated by the Arthritis Foundation and targets a condition that currently affects 300 000 children nationwide, making it one of the most common childhood diseases in the US.

What is Juvenile Arthritis?

The word “arthritis” means joint inflammation in Latin, but juvenile arthritis can impact eyes, skin and the gastrointestinal tract. The disorder takes on a large variety of forms, and researchers and doctors alike are working to better understand the key differences and how varying approaches can help.
Juvenile arthritis (JA) is not a disease in itself. Also known as pediatric rheumatic disease, JA is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases that can develop in children under the age of 16.
Although the various types of juvenile arthritis share many common symptoms, like pain, joint swelling, redness and warmth, each type of JA is distinct and has its own special concerns and symptoms. Some types of juvenile arthritis affect the musculoskeletal system, but joint symptoms may be minor or nonexistent.

Three classifications of juvenile arthritis exist: juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), of which, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is the most common. The classification is made based on symptoms, number of joints involved and the presence of antibodies in the blood

Facts About Juvenile Arthritis

1. Juvenile Arthritis Affects more than Joints

According to the Arthritis Foundation, JA can do more than cause joint discomfort in young people. While many types of JA share commonalities like swelling, “each type of JA is distinct and has its own special concerns and symptoms”, it notes.

For example, some versions of JA don’t fall under the classic definition of arthritis at all; the problem can affect the eyes, skin (Juvenile dermatomyositis) and digestive system as well, according to the foundation.

2. One of the Early Signs of JA is Limping

While some children may not express any pain from the disease, their actions can speak for themselves. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases notes that JA often targets the knees and feet, creating a telltale limp in junior’s walk.

The source also notes that the problem is usually worse first thing in the morning or after a nap, when the joints have a chance to stiffen. Keep an eye out for any strange walking patterns of your child, especially if you can’t recall any recent accidents that would contribute to the limping.

3. It’s Difficult to Say It’s a Genetic Problem

While many diseases are passed down from one parent or both, The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases notes that it’s “very rare” for more than one family member to have JA.

That being said, children who have another family member who has JA are at “slightly increased” risk of developing the problem. Since JA is largely an autoimmune disease (when you immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells), families with a history of autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis or Thyroid inflammation may be at higher risk.

4. Girls are More at Risk

According to HealthCentral.com, Juvenile Arthritis affects more girls than boys, and is likely to develop from ages 2 to 4 or during the adolescent/teen years (but under the age of 16).

While there doesn’t seem to be any solid statistics for girls versus boys when it comes to JA cases, KidsGetArthritisToo.org notes that the most common form of JA is mild oligoarthritis (affecting fewer than five joints) that is usually found in girls aged 8-or younger.

5. Juvenile Arthritis Can be Fatal

Apparently arthritis and other rheumatic conditions (collectively known as AORC) in youth has accounted for deaths in the U.S., according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The source notes that between 1979 and 1998, there were roughly 50 deaths per year (of children younger than 15) attributed to the diseases.

The slightly better news is that during this roughly 20-year period, the death rate related to AORC diseases fell 25-percent from 1.2 deaths per million to 0.9 deaths per million, according to the CDC. These deaths are more common among females than males, according to HealthLine.com, which paints a somewhat bleaker picture regarding JA mortality rates.

6. Juvenile Arthritis is Treatable

At this moment, there is no cure for juvenile arthritis. The custom approach to the disorder is to control pain levels, reduce inflammation and maintain mobility, while in more extreme cases surgery is the only possible solution to prevent further joint damage. Many treatment plans are based on proper medication, therapeutically physical activities, eye care and healthy eating.

The treatments used for Juvenile Arthritis focus on improving quality of life for young people. In some cases, pain medication is the solution, but in some cases anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are used. Doctors may also prescribe DMARDs, a family of drugs that are designed to slow the progression of the juvenile arthritis. Chemotherapy drugs have also been used to battle JA, although in lower doses than when treating cancer patients.

Physical therapy may also be part of the treatment plan to help maintain your child’s flexibility and maintain muscle tone. Probably the most important component of any plan is the way in which all measures are customized for a child’s daily schedule in order to affect the quality of life as little as possible.

Types of Juvenile Arthritis

  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Considered the most common form of arthritis, JIA includes six subtypes: oligoarthritis, polyarthritis, systemic, enthesitis-related, juvenile psoriatic arthritis or undifferentiated.
  • Juvenile dermatomyositis. An inflammatory disease, juvenile dermatomyositis causes muscle weakness and a skin rash on the eyelids and knuckles.
  • Juvenile lupus. Lupus is an autoimmune disease. The most common form is systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE. Lupus can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood and other areas of the body.
  • Juvenile scleroderma.Scleroderma, which literally means “hard skin,” describes a group of conditions that causes the skin to tighten and harden.
  • Kawasaki disease.This disease causes blood-vessel inflammation that can lead to heart complications.
  • Mixed connective tissue disease. This disease may include features of arthritis, lupus dermatomyositis and scleroderma, and is associated with very high levels of a particular antinuclear antibody called anti-RNP.
  • FibromyalgiaThis chronic pain syndrome is an arthritis-related condition, which can cause stiffness and aching, along with fatigue, disrupted sleep and other symptoms. More common in girls, fibromyalgia is seldom diagnosed before puberty.

Juvenile Arthritis Causes

No known cause has been pinpointed for most forms of juvenile arthritis, nor is there evidence to suggest that toxins, foods or allergies cause children to develop JA. Some research points toward a genetic predisposition to juvenile arthritis, which means the combination of genes a child receives from his or her parents may cause the onset of JA when triggered by other factors.

Juvenile Arthritis Symptoms

Each of the different types of JA have their own set of signs and symptoms. You can read more specifics about the diseases by following the links above, and by visiting the Arthritis Foundation’s website dedicated to pediatric rheumatic diseases, KidsGetArthritisToo.

Juvenile Arthritis Diagnosis

The most important step in properly treating juvenile arthritis is getting an accurate diagnosis. The diagnostic process can be long and detailed. There is no single blood test that confirms any type of JA. In children, the key to diagnosis is a careful physical exam, along with a thorough medical history. Any specific tests a doctor may perform will depend upon the type of JA suspected.

Juvenile Arthritis Self Care

An important part of JA treatment is teaching chidlren the importance of following the treatment prescribed by their healthcare team. Self care also involves helping the child address the emotional and social effects of the disease. Self management encompasses the choices made each day to live well and stay healthy and happy.

Finding the Right Physician

You’ll probably first bring your symptoms to the attention of your family doctor, who may refer you to a rheumatologist — a doctor specializing in the treatment of arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles and bone. Because JA can affect many organ systems, you may need to see a variety of medical specialists.

To get the right help, find a rheumatologist or other physician who knows how hard it is to endure a disease so few understand and can truly help.  Go to HealthLynked.com today to build a Free patient profile and begin communicating there with those who will collaborate on your wellness.

Sources:

Arthritis.org

ActiveBeat.com

 

DISCLAIMER: The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only.  Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of HealthLynked Corp and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to health and wellness.

 

 

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Know the Difference: Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis?

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis

 

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a result of the immune system attacking the tissues that line the body’s joints. This causes pain, swelling, and stiffness in the joints and the pain is often symmetrical. It is more common in women and in those who are middle aged, but it can happen to anyone.

Osteoarthritis

 

Osteoarthritis happens over time. It is the most common form of arthritis, and it usually occurs in older people. The protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wear down as you age, making it difficult to move. It usually affects one side of the body. Osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, though it most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips, and spine.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis: Understanding a Difficult Joint Disease

 

When you hear about someone who has arthritis, you might think of an older person with pain or stiffness in his or her joints. But that’s not always the case.

There are many types of arthritis and millions of people in the U.S. have some form of it. One type of arthritis that affects more than 1.5 million people in the U.S. is rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease, which means the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the tissues that line your joints instead of fighting infections.

RA causes pain, swelling, and stiffness in your joints. It usually affects your wrists, hands, and knees, preventing them from working properly. While RA is more common in women age 30 or older, RA can affect all people.

RA is different from the more common osteoarthritis, which is the arthritis that many older people develop over time. No one knows what causes RA. While there is no cure, it can be treated.

What to look for

Symptoms of RA range from mild to severe. Sometimes RA affects one joint at a time, but more typically it presents as pain, warmth, and swelling in the joints on both sides of the body at the same time or on alternating sides.

It can also affect body parts that are not joints, including your eyes, mouth, heart, and lungs. Symptoms can last for only a short time or they can come and go.

It’s important to recognize the signs of RA and see your health care provider as soon as possible to get a proper diagnosis. Your provider will use tests  to help diagnose you and then refer you to a rheumatologist, who focuses on autoimmune illnesses–many of which target the musculoskeletal tissues. You and your rheumatologist can determine the treatment that is best for you.

Symptoms of RA include some or all of the following:

  • Swollen, tender, or warm joints
  • Symmetric swollen joints (on both sides of the body), such as in both your right and left wrists
  • Swollen joints in the wrist and finger joints closest to the hand
  • Other swollen joints such as the neck, shoulders, elbows, hips, knees, ankles, and feet
  • Feeling tired and having low energy
  • Fevers
  • Pain and stiffness that lasts for more than 30 minutes in the morning or after a long rest
  • Symptoms that last for many years

SOURCE: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis Opens new window

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What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis is the second most common type of arthritis and often affects the wrists, hands, knees, ankles, and feet. Find out how this disease damages your joints and makes it painful to move them.

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Why is it Important to Know My Family Health History?

Family Health History: Why It’s Important and What You Should Know
Why is it important to know my family history?

by Kimberly Holland

Family members share more than similar appearance. You may recognize that you have your father’s curly hair or your mother’s button nose. Thank goodness my kids got my wife’s food looks. What is not so easy to see is that your great-grandmother passed along an increased risk for both breast and ovarian cancer.

That’s why discovering and knowing your family health history is vitally important. Your medical history includes all the traits your family shares you can’t see. These traits may increase your risk for many hereditary conditions and diseases, including:

• cancer
• diabetes
• asthma
• heart disease and blood clots
• Alzheimer’s disease and dementia
• arthritis
• depression
• high blood pressure and high cholesterol

Whose history do I need?

The general rule for family health history is that more is better. First, you’ll want to focus on immediate family members who are related to you through blood. Start with your parents, siblings, and children. If they’re still alive, grandparents are another great place to start. They may know partial histories of many members of your family.

You can also gather information from your aunts and uncles, and other blood relatives. Once you move beyond this core circle of family, genetic makeups change so greatly that you may not be able to learn much about your own risk. Still, keep information handy for any family members you learn about during your search for medical history. It may be helpful down the road.

How can I gather this information?

Talking about health may not come naturally to you or your family. You can start the conversation by letting your family members know why you want to gather health information. Also, let them know that you’re willing to share information with them, so that you can all have more complete health histories. It may be easier to start out by having one-on-one conversations.

Get the right information

When you’re ready to gather family health history information, keep these things in mind:

Major medical issues: Ask about every major medical issue anyone in close relation to you has been diagnosed with. In this fact-finding stage, nothing is too small, though issues are only significant if the cause was genetic. Lyme disease, injuries, and other things caused by external factors can’t be inherited.
Causes of death: Find out the cause of death for any family members who’ve passed away. That might provide a clue to your family medical history, too.
Age of onset: Ask when each family member was diagnosed with each condition. This may help your doctor recognize the early onset of certain diseases.
Ethnic background: Different ethnicities have varying levels of risk for certain conditions. As best you can, identify your ethnic background to help spot potential health risks.
Environment: Families share common genes, but they also share common environments, habits, and behaviors. A complete family history also includes understanding what factors in your environment could impact your health.

5 questions to ask

Here are some questions you can ask to start the conversation:

  1. How old was my relative when they died, and what was the cause of death?
  2. Are there health problems that run in the family?
  3. Is there a history of pregnancy loss or birth defects in my family?
  4. What allergies do people in my family have?
  5. What is my ethnicity? (Some conditions are common among certain ethnicities.)

What should I do with this information?

Knowing your own health history is important, and sharing it with your doctor may be more important. That’s because your doctor can help you interpret what it means for your current lifestyle, suggest prevention tips, and decide on screening or testing options for conditions you may be more at risk for developing.

The genes you’re born with can’t be changed or altered. If you know your family history, you’re one step ahead of the game. You can take the initiative to adopt healthier lifestyle habits. For example, you could decide to stop smoking or drinking alcohol, or to start exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy weight. These lifestyle changes may reduce your chances for developing hereditary conditions.

Is incomplete information still useful?

Even a family health history that’s incomplete is still useful to your doctor. Share any information you have with them.

For example, if you know that your sibling was diagnosed with colon cancer at age 35, your doctor may suspect a possible genetic issue. They may then decide it’s important that you have regular colon cancer screenings before the recommended age of 50. Your doctor may also suggest you undergo genetic counseling or testing to identify any genetic risks.

What if I was adopted

Environment plays an important part in your health history, and you can get the details for this from your adoptive family. Learning more about your birth family’s health history may require a large investment of time and energy.

Ask your adoptive parents if they have any information about your birth parents. It’s possible family health history information was shared during the adoption process. If not, ask the agency that arranged the adoption if they retained any personal health history information for your birth parents. Understand your state’s statutes before you begin requesting adoption history information.

If all of these avenues come up short, you may need to make a choice about seeking out your birth parents. You may not wish to pursue that route, or you may be unable to connect with them. In that case, alert your doctor to your personal history. The two of you can then work to identify ways to screen for and detect your risk of certain conditions.

What if I’m estranged from my family?

If you’re estranged from only part of your family, you can try a few things to collect your family health history:

Talk to the family members you’re connected with. You may not need to reconnect with your whole family to collect your family health history.
Reach out via your doctor. Some medical offices may be able to send out questionnaires to family members asking for information in an official capacity. This may prompt people to respond.

Do some research. You may be able to discover the cause of death of your relatives from death certificates. Search online to find state-specific death records or check ancestry sites for this information. Obituaries, often available online or archived by public libraries, might also provide health information.

What about genetic testing and genetic predisposition?

Certain ethnic backgrounds and races may be predisposed to conditions for which a genetic test is useful. For example, women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry have an increased risk for breast cancer. A specific gene mutation is more common in these women than in other women. Genetic screening may help your doctor detect this gene mutation and prepare you for treatment options early.

Although genetic tests can help identify potential risks you may have inherited for a specific disease, they don’t guarantee you’ll develop that disease. Results may show you have a predisposition to several conditions. While you may never actually develop any of these, you might feel the added anxiety isn’t worth the knowledge. Seriously consider the benefits and concerns you may have with knowing your genetic risk factors before you do any testing.

How do I record the details?

Make sure you write down or electronically document the health information your relatives provide. You can use HealthLynked for this. Just complete one profile per family member whose medical records you are responsible for and have other family members complete and share their own with you.

Outlook

Knowing your health history helps you to be more proactive about your health. Share this information with your doctor so they can screen early for conditions you’re predisposed to and suggest lifestyle choices that can help reduce your risk.



Also talk to your doctor if you need more help figuring out how to uncover your health history or what questions you should ask. If you don’t have one you depend on today, you might find a great physician using the first of its kind social ecosystem designed specifically for everything described in the article.

Ready to get Lynked? Go to HealthLynked.com now to start compiling your medical history and sharing with those you choose, for Free, today!

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Bone Marrow Stem Cell Treatment (BMAC) for Knee Osteoarthritis – Mayo Clinic

Shane Shapiro, M.D., orthopedic physician at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses a regenerative medicine clinical research trial to treat knee arthritis, which is the bone marrow stem cell treatment (BMAC) for knee osteoarthritis.

Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Center for Regenerative Medicine is studying biologically based non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis. One such treatment is the harvesting of the patient’s own stem cells from their bone marrow.

“In our procedure we draw cellular rich bone marrow from both sides of the pelvis. We then filter the resulting product and concentrate the stem cells and their corresponding growth factors. Using an ultrasound to image the knee joint, we are then able to precisely inject the cells into the arthritic knee. We are currently demonstrating that this procedure is safe and can relieve pain. We also hope to be able to slow the progression of the degenerative joint disease and perhaps one day regrow cartilage in the arthritic joint.”

—–
See video of this procesure here: http://youtu.be/yUfuhLOgeBw (WARNING: graphic due to the nature of actual surgery footage)

Learn more about the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine here: http://goo.gl/rnRdtU

 

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