How to Check Your Heart Rate

Press through these steps and learn to monitor your pulse.

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How To Do The Heimlich Maneuver

Step-by-step instructions on how to do the Heimlich or abdominal thrusts and unblock a person’s airway.

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The Basics: Blood Donation

Want to give blood? Find out what your need to do before, during, and after donating.

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What are the First Five Steps in First Aid?

According to a Red Cross Survey, too many people have a fear of taking action when someone needs help. The report suggests, for anyone finding themselves in a life-threatening emergency situation, there’s a 50-50 chance  someone will actually step forward to offer first aid.

The survey found:

  • While most (88%) would want someone to come to our aid, only half (50%) of adults would actually feel confident about helping.
  • The majority of those asked (70%) said that they would worry about making it worse or doing something wrong.
  • Most worryingly, just 4% of people knew the correct first aid skills, and said they were both confident and likely to help someone in three of the most life-threatening scenarios, such as heavy bleeding or someone stopping breathing.

By administering immediate care during an emergency, you can help an ill or injured person before EMS, or Emergency Medical Services, arrive.  You may even help save a life.  However, even after training, remembering the right first aid steps – and administering them correctly – can be difficult.  In order to help you deliver the right care at the right time, the Red Cross has created this simple step-by-step guide that you can print up and place on your refrigerator, in your car, in your bag or at your desk.


1.  Before administering care to an ill or injured person, check the scene and the person. Size up the scene and form an initial impression.

Pause and look at the scene and the person before responding. Answer the following questions:

  • Is the scene safe to enter?
  • What happened?
  • How many people are involved?
  • What is my initial impression about the nature of the person’s illness or injury?
  • Does the person have any life-threatening conditions, such as severe, life-threatening bleeding?
  • Is anyone else available to help?

2.  If the Person is awake and Responsive and there is no severe life-threatening bleeding:

  • Obtain consent: Tell the person your name, describe type and level of training, state what you think is wrong and what you plan to do, and ask permission to provide care.
  • Tell a bystander to get the AED and first aid kit: Point to a bystander and speak out loud.
  • Use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE); Put on gloves, if available.
  • Interview the person: Use questions to gather more information about signs and symptoms, allergies, medications, pertinent medical history, last food or drink and events leading up to the incident.
  • Conduct a head-to-toe check: Check head and neck, shoulders, chest and abdomen, hips, legs and feet, arms and hands for signs of injury.
  • Provide care consistent with knowledge and training according to the conditions you find.

3.  If the Person Appears Unresponsive:

Shout to get the person’s attention, using the person’s name if it is known. If there is no response, tap the person’s shoulder (if the person is an adult or child) or the bottom of the person’s foot (if the person is an infant) and shout again, while checking for normal breathing. Check for Responsiveness and breathing for no more than 5-10 seconds.

4.  If the person is breathing:

  • Send someone to call 911 or the designated emergency number and obtain an AED and first aid kit.
  • Proceed with gathering information from bystanders using questions.
  • Conduct a head-to-toe check.
  • Roll the person onto his or her side into a recovery position if there are no obvious signs of injury.

5.  If the person is NOT breathing:

  • Send someone to call 911 or the designated emergency number and obtain an AED and first aid kit.
  • Ensure that the person is face-up on a firm, flat surface such as the floor or ground.
  • Begin CPR (starting with compressions) or use an AED if one is immediately available.
  • Continue administering CPR until the person exhibits signs of life, such as breathing, an AED becomes available, or EMS or trained medical responders arrive on scene.

Note:  End CPR if the scene becomes unsafe or you cannot continue due to exhaustion.


Often, the first responders that save lives are not medically trained professionals.  It is essential, in those first few minutes, those who need medical attention receive care, even from those not necessarily medically trained.

The first steps you take in medicine are often the most important.  Just like taking control of a First Aid situation, taking control of your healthcare today can be the first important step toward wellness.  At HealthLynked, we can help.

Mange your own medical records and those of your family, carry them with you wherever you go, and make appointments on the fly.  All this for Free!

Go to HealthLynked.com, now, to take the fist steps to better wellness.

How to Check Your Blood Pressure

Roll up your sleeve and slide on that blood pressure cuff. It’s important to check how well your heart pumps blood. Here’s how.

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