49,XXXXY syndrome – Genetics Home Reference

 

49,XXXXY syndrome is a chromosomal condition in boys and men that causes intellectual disability, developmental delays, physical differences, and an inability to father biological children (infertility). Its signs and symptoms vary among affected individuals.

Boys and men with 49,XXXXY syndrome have mild or moderate intellectual disability with learning difficulties. Speech and language development is particularly affected. Most affected boys and men can understand what other people say more easily than they themselves can speak. People with 49,XXXXY syndrome tend to be shy and friendly, but problems with speech and communication can contribute to behavioral issues, including irritability, difficulty tolerating frustration, defiant behavior, and outbursts or temper tantrums.

49,XXXXY syndrome is also associated with weak muscle tone (hypotonia) and problems with coordination that delay the development of motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking. Affected infants and young boys are often shorter than their peers, but some catch up in height later in childhood or adolescence.

Other physical differences associated with 49,XXXXY syndrome include abnormal fusion of certain bones in the forearm (radioulnar synostosis), an unusually large range of joint movement (), elbow abnormalities, curved pinky fingers (fifth finger ), and flat feet (). Affected individuals have distinctive facial features that can include widely spaced eyes (), outside corners of the eyes that point upward (), skin folds covering the inner corner of the eyes (epicanthal folds), and a flat bridge of the nose. Dental abnormalities are also common in this disorder.

49,XXXXY syndrome disrupts male sexual development. The penis is often short and underdeveloped, and the testes may be undescended, which means they are abnormally located inside the pelvis or abdomen. The testes are small and do not produce enough testosterone, which is the hormone that directs male sexual development. The shortage of testosterone often leads to incomplete puberty. Starting in adolescence, affected boys and men may have sparse body hair, and some experience breast enlargement (gynecomastia). Their testes do not produce sperm, so all men with 49,XXXXY syndrome are infertile.

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Spastic paraplegia type 49 – Genetics Home Reference

 

Spastic paraplegia type 49 is part of a group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and the development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve only the lower limbs, whereas the complex types also involve the upper limbs (to a lesser degree) and other problems with the nervous system. Spastic paraplegia type 49 is a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

Spastic paraplegia type 49 often begins with weak muscle tone (hypotonia) that starts in infancy. During childhood, spasticity and paraplegia develop and gradually worsen, causing difficulty walking and frequent falls. In addition, affected individuals have moderate to severe intellectual disability and distinctive physical features, including short stature; chubbiness; an unusually small head size (); a wide, short skull (); a short, ; and . Some people with spastic paraplegia type 49 develop seizures.

Problems with autonomic nerve cells (autonomic ), which control involuntary body functions such as heart rate, digestion, and breathing, result in several features of spastic paraplegia type 49. Affected individuals have difficulty feeding beginning in infancy. They experience a backflow of stomach acids into the esophagus (called or GERD), causing vomiting. GERD can also lead to recurrent bacterial lung infections called aspiration pneumonia, which can be life-threatening. In addition, people with spastic paraplegia type 49 have problems regulating their breathing, resulting in pauses in breathing (apnea), initially while sleeping but eventually also while awake. Their blood pressure, pulse rate, and body temperature are also irregular.

People with spastic paraplegia type 49 can develop recurrent episodes of severe weakness, hypotonia, and abnormal breathing, which can be life threatening. By early adulthood, some affected individuals need a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).

Other signs and symptoms of spastic paraplegia type 49 reflect problems with sensory neurons, which transmit information about sensations such as pain, temperature, and touch to the brain. Many affected individuals are less able to feel pain or temperature sensations than individuals in the general population. Affected individuals also have abnormal or absent reflexes (areflexia).

Because of the nervous system abnormalities that occur in spastic paraplegia type 49, it has been suggested that the condition also be classified as a hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, which is a group of conditions that affect sensory and autonomic neurons.

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