Researchers Strive to Help Paralyzed Man Make Strides – Mayo Clinic

With the flip of a switch, a Wisconsin man’s legs reawaken after years of paralysis. Mayo Clinic researchers combine intense therapy with an electronic stimulator surgically implanted on a patient’s damaged spinal cord.

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Upper Limb Amputation Patient Education Video

Patients have many questions when facing an upper limb amputation. Hear directly from patients about their prosthetics and how they’ve adjusted to every day life.

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Researchers Extend Lifespan by as Much as 35 Percent in Mice

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that senescent cells – cells that no longer divide and accumulate with age – negatively impact health and shorten lifespan by as much as 35 percent in normal mice. The results, which appear today in Nature, demonstrate that clearance of senescent cells delays tumor formation, preserves tissue and organ function, and extends lifespan without observed adverse effects.

“Cellular senescence is a biological mechanism that functions as an ‘emergency brake’ used by damaged cells to stop dividing,” says Jan van Deursen, Ph.D., Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular biology at Mayo Clinic, and senior author of the paper. “While halting cell division of these cells is important for cancer prevention, it has been theorized that once the ‘emergency brake’ has been pulled, these cells are no longer necessary.”

The immune system sweeps out the senescent cells on a regular basis, but over time becomes less effective. Senescent cells produce factors that damage adjacent cells and cause chronic inflammation, which is closely associated with frailty and age-related diseases.

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Fecal Transplants for Ulcerative Colitis? – IBD in the News

Edward Loftus Jr., M.D., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic, talks about two newly published studies in the July 2015 issue of Gastroenterology; the studies examine the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in ulcerative colitis.

For more information, visit: http://ibdblog.mayoclinic.org/?mc_id=us&utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=sm&utm_content=video&utm_campaign=mayoclinic&geo=national&placementsite=enterprise&cauid=100504

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Mayo Clinic SURF program: Tamiel Turley’s Story

Meet Tamiel Turley, a senior at Texas Woman’s University who spent 10 weeks away from her family this past summer as a participant in the prestigious Mayo Clinic Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF).

Developed by Mayo Graduate School, Mayo’s school for Ph.D. training, SURF is the first-of-its-kind initiative in the nation to bring together diverse college students from across the country for summer research apprenticeship training with Mayo Clinic scientists.

Learn more about Tamiel’s experience with the program, which exists on all Mayo campuses and receives nearly 1,200 applicants per year.

Learn more about SURF by visiting www.mayo.edu.

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Somatic Symptom Disorders Part I: New Terminology for New Concepts

Dr. Jeffrey Staab, Mayo Clinic Psychiatrist, discusses the concepts that led to the development of the new terminology for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). In DSM-4 somatic symptom disorders were defined negatively, by what they were not. Conversely, the DSM-5 emphasizes a couple core somatic symptom disorders and identifies the key features that can help determine the presence of these disorders. The DSM-5 looks to identify patterns of symptoms that can be identified positively, not the absence of a medical explanation or presumption of a psychological conflict. The change in nomenclature is the next step in the ever-evolving definition of these disorders.

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Fibromuscular Dysplasia: A Mystery of Vascular Medicine

Mayo Clinic vascular specialists, Robert McBane, M.D., Thom Rooke, M.D., Sanjay Misra, M.D., and Iftikhar Kullo, M.D., cover the rare disorder fibromuscular dysplasia in this video originally posted on Medscape Cardiology.

For more information visit: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fibromuscular-dysplasia/basics/definition/con-20034731/?mc_id=youtube

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Will At Home Testing Improve Screening and Lower Cancer Rates?

Mailing colorectal cancer screening tests to patients insured by Medicaid increased screening rates for this population, report researchers at the University of North Carolina Comprehensive Cancer Center.

In collaboration with the Mecklenburg County Health Department in Charlotte, researchers with UNC Lineberger’s Carolina Cancer Screening Initiative examined the impact of targeted outreach to more than 2,100 people insured by Medicaid who were not up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening. The project resulted in a nearly 9 percentage point percent increase in screening rates for patients who received a screening kit in the mail compared with patients who just received a reminder, and it demonstrated that their method could serve as a model to improve screening on a larger scale. The findings were published in the journal Cancer.

The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 97,000 people will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the United States this year, and it will result in approximately 50,600 deaths. It is third most common type of cancer in the United States, and the second leading cause of cancer death.  Cancer, overall, is the second killer in the US, behind heart disease.

While colorectal cancer screening has proven effective in reducing cancer deaths, researchers report too few people are getting screened. Current guidelines from ACS recommend regular screening with either a high-sensitivity stool-based test or a structural (visual) exam for average-risk people aged 45 years and older, and that all positive results should be followed with colonoscopy.

Despite these recommendation, studies have identified notable gaps in screening rates, including by race, geographic region and other socioeconomic factors. Among patients who are insured, people with Medicaid have the lowest rates of colorectal cancer testing.

“There has been a national push to increase colorectal cancer screening rates since colorectal cancer is a preventable disease, but screening rates are only about 63 percent, and low-income, and otherwise vulnerable populations, tend to be screened at even lower rates,” said the study’s first author UNC Lineberger’s Alison Brenner, Ph.D., MPH, research assistant professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine.

For the project, researchers either mailed reminders about colorectal cancer screening and instructions on how to arrange one with the health department, or reminders plus a fecal immunochemical test, or FIT kit, which can detect blood in the stool—a symptom of colon cancer. The patient completes the test at home and returns it to a provider for analysis. Patients who have a positive FIT kit result will be scheduled for a colonoscopy.

The UNC Lineberger researchers worked with the Mecklenburg County Health Department staff, who coordinated the reminders and mailings and ran the test analyses. They also partnered with Medicaid care coordinators to provide patient navigation support to patients who had abnormal test results and required a colonoscopy.

Twenty-one percent of patients who received FIT kits in the mail completed the screening test, compared with 12 percent of patients who just received a reminder. Eighteen people who completed FIT tests had abnormal results, and 15 of those people were eligible for a colonoscopy. Of the 10 who completed the colonoscopy, one patient had an abnormal result.

“Preventive care amongst vulnerable populations rarely rises to the top of the mental queue of things that need to get done,” Brenner said. “In North Carolina, many Medicaid recipients are on disability. Making something like colorectal cancer screening as simple and seamless as possible is really important. If it’s right in front of someone, it’s more likely to get done, even if there are simple barriers in place.”

Brenner said the study shows the potential to harness resources like the county health department for health prevention services.

“This collaborative and pragmatic quality improvement effort demonstrates the feasibility, acceptability, and efficiency of using existing health services resources and infrastructure, including Medicaid-based navigation to colonoscopy to deliver timely cancer screening services to low income populations,” said UNC Lineberger’s Stephanie Wheeler, Ph.D., MPH, associate professor in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the study’s senior author.

She said researchers plan to move forward to study whether they can implement their approach on a larger scale, and to understand all of the cost implications.

“This is looking at expanding the medical neighborhood—to harness community resources to target patients and in this case, insured patients, who are maybe not getting this from a primary health care organization, and how to increase screening rates in these types of vulnerable populations,” Brenner said.


If you are looking for a doctor to discuss the need for colon cancer screening or your results, you can find a physician at HealthLynked.com.  We are the first ever healthcare social ecosystem designed to Improve HealthCare.

Connect and collaborate with physicians in your area specializing in gastrointestinal disorders, or any other assorted medical malaise.  Even find testing right in the platform you can have delivered to your door.

Ready to get Lynked?  Go to HealthLynked.com right now to sign up for free!

Source:  originally printed, “By sending tests in the mail, researchers boost colorectal cancer screening.”  July 14, 2018 , UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

More information: Alison T. Brenner et al, Comparative effectiveness of mailed reminders with and without fecal immunochemical tests for Medicaid beneficiaries at a large county health department: A randomized controlled trial, Cancer (2018).  DOI: 10.1002/cncr.31566

Provided by: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

 

 

The Real Moonlight Graham: A Life Well Lived – Preview

An intriguing character in the classic film Field of Dreams, he was Archie “Moonlight” Graham, an accomplished athlete … as well as Archibald Graham, M.D., the beloved “Doc” in Chisholm, Minn., who collaborated with Mayo Clinic researchers in a landmark medical study.

This film shows both dimensions of a remarkable man — and how the bonds of professionalism and service linked community health care with a world-renowned medical center. Look for interviews, photos and historic films, many of which are presented in public for the first time.

Mayo Clinic Heritage Films produces original documentaries and dramatizations about key aspects of Mayo’s history. With the generous support of our benefactors, these award-winning films include cinematography of the highest quality; rare photos, movies and artifacts; and interviews with people who took part in historic events. Enjoy these previews and visit http://store.mayoclinic.com/productList.cfm?mpc=6 to purchase the full-length DVD. Proceeds from the sale of each film support Mayo’s not-for-profit mission of excellence in patient care, research and education.

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