15 Hot Off The Mat Benefits of Practicing Yoga | Health News

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Married with Bipolar – Bipolar Disorder: In Our Own Words

Mehri Coulter’s husband Logan has learned that there’s nothing he can do to change her bipolar disorder – but he can be there for her. http://wb.md/2wJAAeK

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About HealthLynked

Improving healthcare is the mission of HealthLynked. HealthLynked focuses on improving healthcare services for patients as well as physicians. Our technology shortens wait time with online scheduling of appointments, Real-time appointments by local providers and provides easy access to yours as well as your family’s updated medical records.

Appointments can be comfortably made online and providing your healthcare provider access to your medical files. The website also makes it possible to link together family members and provide access to critical information in case of an emergency

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14 Bolts of Inside[r] Info on Lightning | National Safety News

This weekend, for Father’s Day, I had the opportunity to celebrate early with my oldest, her husband and their newborn.  They asked me what I wanted to do, and I volunteered a boat ride to a distant restaurant on the lake we all love.  I say this, but I know my wife, wisely, does not always enjoy the ride, mostly because of the wicked weather that often kicks up on the warm afternoons where we live.

We always check the satellite and motored out after seeing we were clear for the rest of the day.  After dinner, we checked again before shoving off to see a few storms were popping up about 45 miles away.  NO threat to our return leg.

As we headed home, a cloud to the east, where we were headed, started to take on a more ominous shape and started spitting a little rain.  Then, it deeply darkened, and streaks of lightning shot to earth underneath.

We skirted the storm for 30 minutes and headed to a place we knew we could find shelter.  We hunkered down for about an hour, then headed home, a little more tired but safe after the slight scare.  While we did a lot of things right, I recognize now, we also were at significant risk.  The wide eyed look of my granddaughter will always remind me of this.

Summertime across the country means barbecues, festivals, sporting events, boating, hitting the beach, camping, and many other recreational activities. In short, summertime means a lot more people are spending a lot more time in the great outdoors.

We always look forward to the outdoor adventuring this time of the year brings, but it is also the peak season for one of the nation’s deadliest weather phenomena — lightning. Lightning typically receives less attention than other storm-related killers because it does not result in mass destruction or mass casualties like tornadoes, floods, tsunamis or hurricanes often do.

Consider these lightning statistics:

  • About 25 million cloud-to-ground lightning strikes occur in the United States each year. Around the globe, there are about 100 strikes every second!
  • Over the last 30 years, the U.S. has averaged 51 lightning fatalities per year. The great news:  2017 was the least lethal year since we started recording the stats in 1940, with only 16 deaths.  This is most likely due to increasing awareness.
  • Only about 10% of people struck by lightning are actually killed. The other 90% must cope with varying degrees of discomfort and disability, sometimes for the rest of their lives.
  • People struck by lightning are not electrified! They will need your immediate medical attention or first aid.  Help them immediately.
  • Typically, the vast majority of lightning victims each year are male (in 261 instances from 2006-2013, 81% of lightning fatalities were male and 19% were female).

The purpose of Lightning Safety Awareness Week is to educate and raise awareness about the hazards of lightning in order to lower the number of deaths and injuries caused by lightning strikes. Remember, lightning makes every single thunderstorm a potential killer, whether the storm produces one single bolt or ten thousand bolts. 

 Lightning Fatality Statistics

From 2006 through 2017, 376 people were struck and killed by lightning in the United States.  Almost two thirds of the deaths occurred to people who had been enjoying outdoor leisure activities.  The common belief that golfers are responsible for the greatest number of lightning deaths was shown to be a myth.  During this 12-year period fishermen accounted for more than three times as many fatalities as golfers, while beach activities and camping each accounted for about twice as many deaths as golf.  From 2006 to 2017, there were a total of 34 fishing deaths, 22 beach deaths, 19 camping deaths, and 17 boating deaths.

Of the sports activities, soccer saw the greatest number of deaths with 12, as compared to golf with 10.  Around the home, yard work (including mowing the lawn) accounted for 14 fatalities.  For work-related activities, ranching/farming topped the list with 17 deaths.

Males accounted for 80% of all fatalities, and more than 90% of the deaths in the fishing, sports and work categories.  Females had comparatively fewer deaths than men in every category, with their highest percentages in the boating-related activities (35%) and routine daily/weekly activities (34%).

June, July, and August are the peak months for lightning activity across the United States and the peak months for outdoor summer activities.  As a result, more than 70% of the lightning deaths occurred in the months of June, July, and August, with Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays having slightly more deaths than other days of the week.

Ages of the victims varied from young children to older adults with the greatest number of fatalities between the ages of 10 and 60.  Within that age range, there was a relative minimum in deaths for people in their 30s, possibly due to parents of young children being less involved in vulnerable activities.

Based on the media reports of the fatal incidents, many victims were either headed to safety at the time of the fatal strike or were just steps away from safety.  Continued efforts are needed to convince people to get inside a safe place before the lightning threat becomes significant.  For many activities, situational awareness and proper planning are essential to safety.

To put this all into perspective, while you are more likely to be struck TWICE  by lightning than win the lottery, you are TWICE as likely to be killed by a dog attack than lightning.  Some small comfort.

Lightning Myths and Facts

 

Myth: A lightning victim is electrified. If you touch him, you’ll risk being electrocuted.
Fact: The human body does not store electricity, and lightning victims require immediate medical attention. It is perfectly safe to touch a lightning victim in order to give them first aid. Call 911 for help.

Myth: If it’s not raining or there aren’t any clouds overhead, you’re safe from lightning.
Fact: Lightning often strikes several miles from the center of a thunderstorm, far outside the rain or thunderstorm cloud. In fact, “bolts from the blue” can strike as far as 25 miles out from the parent thunderstorm. That’s why it’s important to seek shelter at the first indication of a thunderstorm and stay there until 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder.

Myth: The rubber soles of shoes or rubber tires on a car will protect you from a lightning strike.
Fact: Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning, but most vehicles with metal tops and sides do provide adequate shelter from lightning because the charge travels through the metal frame and eventually into the ground. Just be sure to avoid contact with anything inside the vehicle that conducts electricity. Remember, convertibles, motorcycles, bicycles, open-shelled outdoor recreational vehicles and cars with fiberglass shells offer no protection from lightning.

Myth: “Heat Lightning” occurs after very hot summer days and poses no threat.
Fact: Many people incorrectly think that “heat lightning” is a specific type of lightning. Actually, it is just lightning from a thunderstorm that is too far away for any thunder to be heard (thunder is seldom heard beyond 10 miles under ideal conditions). If the storm approaches, the same lightning safety guidelines above should be followed.

Myth: Lightning never strikes the same place twice.
Fact: Lightning often strikes the same place or object repeatedly, especially if it’s tall, pointy, and isolated. The Empire State Building is struck by lightning nearly 100 times each year.

Myth: If caught outside during a thunderstorm, you should seek shelter under a tree.
Fact: Seeking shelter under a tree is one of the leading causes of lightning related fatalities. Remember, NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, keep moving toward a safe shelter.

Myth: Metal structures or metal on the body (jewelry, watches, etc.) attract lightning.
Fact: The presence of metal has no bearing on where lightning will strike. Mountains are made of rock but get struck by lightning many times a year. Rather, an object’s height, shape, and isolation are the dominant factors that affect its likelihood of being struck by lightning. While metal does not attract lightning, it obviously does conduct electricity, so stay away from metal fences, railings, bleachers, etc. during a thunderstorm.

Myth: If caught outside during a thunderstorm, you should lie flat on the ground.
Fact: NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, keep moving toward a safe shelter.

 Lightning Safety Guidelines

Lightning is one of the most erratic and unpredictable characteristics of a thunderstorm. Because of this, no one can guarantee an individual or group absolute protection from lightning. However, knowing and following proven lightning safety guidelines can greatly reduce the risk of injury or death.

Most lightning victims are not struck during the worst of a thunderstorm but rather before or after the storm reaches its greatest intensity. This is because many people are unaware that lightning can strike as far as 25 miles away from its parent thunderstorm – much farther out from the area of rainfall within the storm!  “Blue sky” lightning is common at 10 miles from an area storm.

Therefore, if you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance. Seek safe shelter immediately. Remember this lightning safety rule: WHEN THUNDER ROARS, GO INDOORS…and stay there until 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder. Do not wait for the rain to start before you decide to seek shelter, and do not leave shelter just because the rain has ended.

The best way to protect yourself and your family from the dangers of thunderstorms is to be prepared. If you have outdoor plans, be sure to familiarize yourself with the latest weather forecast before heading out. Upon arriving on-site, determine where you will seek shelter in the event of a thunderstorm and how long it would take to reach that shelter. A sturdy, enclosed structure with plumbing and electrical wiring is safest, but if one is not available most enclosed metal vehicles are safe alternatives.

Cancel or postpone outdoor activities if thunderstorms develop.  During your outdoor activities, keep an eye to the sky for developing thunderstorms. If thunder is heard, if lightning is seen, or even if thunderclouds are developing, get to your place of shelter without delay! Have a lightning safety plan.

WHERE NOT TO GO:

Not all types of buildings or vehicles are safe during thunderstorms. Buildings with exposed sides are NOT safe(even if they are “grounded”). These include beach shacks, metal sheds, picnic shelters/pavilions, carports, and baseball dugouts. Porches are dangerous as well.

Convertible vehicles offer no safety from lightning, even if the top is up. Other vehicles which are NOT safe during thunderstorms are those with open cabs, such as golf carts, tractors, and construction equipment.

WHERE TO GO:

The safest location during a thunderstorm is inside a large enclosed structure with plumbing and electrical wiring. These include shopping centers, schools, office buildings, and private residences. If lightning strikes the building, the plumbing and wiring will conduct the electricity and eventually direct it into the ground.

If no substantial buildings are available, then an enclosed metal vehicle such as an automobile, van, or school bus would be a suitable alternative.

While being inside a house or other building with electrical wiring and plumbing is your safest option during a thunderstorm, it does not guarantee you will be 100% safe from lightning. There are still some lightning safety guidelines you must follow while inside a place of shelter to keep yourself safe.

  • Don’t use corded phones:  Using a corded phone during a thunderstorm is one of the leading causes of indoor lightning injuries. However, it IS safe to use cordless or cell phones as long as they are not being charged.
  • Stay away from windows and doors:Sitting on an open porch to watch a thunderstorm is also dangerous. It is best to be in an interior room during a thunderstorm.
  • Don’t touch electrical equipment or cords:  Any device that uses electricity (e.g. computers, televisions, household appliances, etc.) is susceptible to a lightning strike. Electrical surges caused by lightning can damage electronics (even at some distance from the actual strike), and a typical surge protector will do little to protect the device (or the person using it) if lightning should strike. So, consider unplugging certain appliances or electronics, but for your own safety do this BEFORE the storm arrives.
  • Avoid plumbing:  Metal plumbing and the water inside are both very good conductors of electricity. Therefore, do not wash your hands or dishes, take a shower or bath, do laundry, etc. during a thunderstorm.
  • Refrain from touching concrete surfaces:Lightning can travel through the metal wires or bars in concrete walls and flooring, such as in the basement or garage.
  • If inside a vehicle:  Roll the windows up and avoid contact with any conducting paths leading to the outside of the vehicle (e.g. metal surfaces, ignition, portable electronic devices plugged in for charging, etc.).

While we won’t be there to warn you of an impending strike, we will always be there with Ready medical Information if you ever need to call for emergency services.  With HealthLynked, you are able to compile and safely collate all of your medical information in one convenient place should you ever need to access it fast.

Come in out of the rain and steer clear of the storm of finding a physician just right for you.  Go to HealthLynked.com today to sign up for Free and take comfort knowing your health information is with you wherever you may go….

Stay safe!

Sources:

weather.gov

nationalgeographic.com

  

 

 

 

What Is a Spleen and What Does it Do?

It’s that organ right behind the stomach and under the lungs, but honestly what does the spleen do? Can you live without it? Learn more: http://wb.md/2cCQMJj

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About HealthLynked

Improving healthcare is the mission of HealthLynked. HealthLynked focuses on improving healthcare services for patients as well as physicians. Our technology shortens wait time with online scheduling of appointments, Real-time appointments by local providers and provides easy access to yours as well as your family’s updated medical records.

Appointments can be comfortably made online and providing your healthcare provider access to your medical files. The website also makes it possible to link together family members and provide access to critical information in case of an emergency

Download APP Now

Future of HealthCare

World Sickle Cell Day | Symptoms and Emerging New Treatments

Approximately 70,000 to 100,000 Americans have sickle cell disease.  Though rare, it is the the most common form of inherited blood disorders. In Africa, the burden is much higher – Sub-Saharan Africa has an estimated 64% of the 300, 000 people born annually with sickle cell disease in the world,  Sickle Cell Day each June 19th provides an opportunity to examine progress and persistent challenges in managing the disease.

Sickle Cell, present in affected individuals at birth, causes the production of abnormal hemoglobin. Normal hemoglobin protein, which resides inside red blood cells, attaches to oxygen in the lungs and carries it to all parts of the body. Healthy red blood cells are flexible enough to move through the smallest blood vessels.

In sickle cell disease, the hemoglobin is abnormal, causing red blood cells to be rigid and shaped like a sickle – the shape from which the disease takes its name.  In order for a child to inherit sickle cell disease, both parents must have either sickle cell disease (two sickle cell genes) or sickle cell trait (one sickle cell gene). There are variations of sickle cell disease called sickle C or sickle thalassemia, which are serious conditions but sometimes less severe. If you have sickle cell disease, you will pass one sickle cell gene to your children.

Signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease usually begin in early childhood. Characteristic features of this disorder include a low number of red blood cells (anemia), repeated infections, and periodic episodes of pain. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person. Some people have mild symptoms, while others are frequently hospitalized for more serious complications.

Sickle cells can get stuck and block blood flow, causing pain and infections. Complications of sickle cell disease occur because the sickled cells block blood flow to specific organs. The worst complications include stroke, acute chest syndrome (a condition that lowers the level of oxygen in the blood), organ damage, other disabilities, and even premature death.

These signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease are caused by the “sickling” of red blood cells. When red blood cells sickle, they also break down prematurely, which can lead to anemia. Anemia can cause shortness of breath, fatigue, and delayed growth and development in children. The rapid breakdown of red blood cells may also cause yellowing of the eyes and skin, which are signs of jaundice.

Painful episodes can occur when sickled red blood cells- stiff and inflexible – get stuck in small blood vessels. These episodes deprive tissues and organs of oxygen-rich blood and can lead to organ damage, especially in the lungs, kidneys, spleen, and brain.

A particularly serious complication of sickle cell disease is high blood pressure in the blood vessels that supply the lungs (pulmonary hypertension). Pulmonary hypertension occurs in about one-third of adults with sickle cell disease and can lead to heart failure.

Mutations in the HBB gene cause sickle cell disease.

Hemoglobin consists of four protein subunits; typically, two alpha-globin subunits and two beta-globin subunits. The HBB gene provides instructions for making beta-globin. Variations of beta-globin result from different mutations in the HBB gene. One particular HBB gene mutation produces an abnormal version of beta-globin known as hemoglobin S (HbS). Other mutations in the HBB gene lead to additional abnormal versions of beta-globin, such as hemoglobin C (HbC) and hemoglobin E (HbE). HBB gene mutations can also result in an unusually low level of beta-globin; this abnormality is called beta thalassemia.

In people with sickle cell disease, at least one beta-globin subunit in hemoglobin is replaced with hemoglobin S. In sickle cell anemia, hemoglobin S replaces both beta-globin subunits in hemoglobin.

In other types of sickle cell disease, just one beta-globin subunit in hemoglobin is replaced with hemoglobin S.  The other beta-globin subunit is replaced with a different abnormal variant, such as hemoglobin C.  For example, people with sickle-hemoglobin C (HbSC) disease have hemoglobin molecules with hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C instead of beta-globin.  If mutations that produce hemoglobin S and beta thalassemia occur together, individuals have hemoglobin S-beta thalassemia (HbSBetaThal) disease.

Sickle Cell Trait

Sickle cell trait is an inherited blood disorder that affects approximately 8 percent of African-Americans. Unlike sickle cell disease, in which patients have two genes that cause the production of abnormal hemoglobin, individuals with sickle cell trait carry only one defective gene and typically live normal lives without health problems related to sickle cell. Rarely, extreme conditions such as severe dehydration and high-intensity physical activity can lead to serious health issues, including sudden death, in individuals with sickle cell trait.

Risk Factors

Sickle cell disease is more common in certain ethnic groups, including:

  • People of African descent, including African-Americans (among whom 1 in 12 carries a sickle cell gene)
  • Hispanic-Americans from Central and South America
  • People of Middle Eastern, Asian, Indian, and Mediterranean descent

Because sickle cell disease symptoms can begin by four months of age, early diagnosis is critical. All newborns in the United States are now tested for the disease. Sickle cell disease can also be identified before birth by testing a sample of amniotic fluid or tissue from the placenta. People who carry the sickle cell gene can seek genetic counseling before pregnancy to discuss options.

Signs and Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease can be mild or severe enough to require frequent hospitalizations. They may include:

  • Anemia (looking pale)
  • Dark urine
  • Yellow eyes
  • Painful swelling of hands and feet
  • Frequent pain episodes
  • Stunted growth
  • Stroke

Treatment

There are no standard treatments that cure sickle cell disease. However, there are regiments that help people manage and live with the disease. Treatment relieves pain, prevents infections, minimizes organ damage, and controls complications. At times, blood transfusions and other advanced options are needed.

Clinical trials provide access to experimental therapies for treating sickle cell disease. The American Society of Hematology (ASH) provides information on clinical trials for which you may be eligible. Researchers are looking at new drugs and also exploring the use of bone marrow transplants to treat sickle cell disease. Stem cell transplants, associated with significant risks, are appropriate only for some patients with severe forms of sickle cell disease and closely matched donors –  typically family member.

Beyond this, the completion of the Human Genome Project and the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing have begun to transform the diagnosis and management of disease. Sickle cell disease has been considered a perfect model for genomic research because: 1) it is a monogenic disease and 2.) it has no cure despite the significant incidence of morbidity and mortality. Recent use of gene editing to minimize disease severity, and a single report of a patient who received successful treatment with gene therapy, highlight the potential for translating genome-based knowledge into health benefits for sickle cell patients.

It is important for you to talk with your doctor if you believe you may have sickle cell disease. If you carry the sickle cell trait, make sure you tell your doctor before getting pregnant as well. Depending on your condition, your doctor may refer you to a hematologist, a doctor who specializes in blood conditions.

Finding the right physician or medical care team just got that much easier.  Using HealthLynked, you can locate physicians in your area who know how to help and are focused on giving you the best possible care.  They will collaborate with you to make sure all your relevant and real time health information is available to enhance your wellness.

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6.5 Ways to Refocus on Health this Father’s Day

At HealthLynked, we believe every day is a great day to focus on wellness and remind those around you health is true wealth.  Today, Father’s Day, is another great opportunity to heighten the awareness of preventable health disorders and disease and encourage the men in your life to be more active and health conscious.

For Father’s Day, we serve up these gentle reminders of 6 ways you can refocus on your health, courtesy of the CDC:

  1. Get Enough Sleep

Aim for seven to nine hours per night.  Your mind and muscles need the recovery.

  1. Stop Smoking

If you quit now, you’ll lower your risk for cancer, COPD, and other smoking-related illnesses.

  1. Exercise More

Enjoy at least 2 ½ hours of aerobic activity, plus muscle-strengthening exercises, each week.

  1. Eat Healthy

Your diet should include a variety of well proportioned proteins and fruits and vegetables daily.

  1. Reduce Stress

You’ll feel much more relaxed if you avoid drugs and alcohol, connect socially, and find support.

  1. Get Regular Checkups

You need to know your blood pressure and cholesterol numbers; if they’re elevated, your risk for heart disease and stroke goes up…. High blood pressure may even increase your risk for erectile dysfunction!  You also need screening for colorectal and prostate cancer.  Across every spectrum of disease, positive outcomes are more likely with early detection.

The Truth

Men simply do not visit caregivers as often as they should. According to a CDC report, women are 100% more likely to visit a physician for preventive services and routine checkups.  The same report remarks men are 33% less likely to see their doctor for any reason, even when symptomatic.

The American Heart Association outlines the following 10 common excuses men give for not seeing a doctor:

“I don’t have a doctor.”

Step one toward staying healthy is finding a doctor you trust, and you’ll never know if you trust one unless you try. Check your insurance company and our healthcare ecosystem for one in your area. Call their offices and ask questions.

“I don’t have insurance.”

Everybody should still have insurance under the Affordable Care Act. If you don’t, there are plenty of resources available from state, local and charitable organizations to pay for your care.  Seek them out….

“There’s probably nothing wrong.”

You may be right, but Some serious diseases don’t have symptoms. High blood pressure is one, and it can cause heart attack and stroke. (That’s why they call it “the silent killer.”)  High cholesterol is another often-symptomless condition. Ditto diabetes. Finding a health problem early can make an enormous difference in the quality and length of your life.

“I don’t want to hear what I might be told.”

Maybe you smoke, drink too much, or have put on weight. Even so, your doctor’s there to help you. You can deny your reality, but you can’t deny the consequences. So be smart: Listen to someone who’ll tell you truths you need to hear. Be coachable.

“I don’t have time.”

There are about 8,766 hours in a year, and you want to save … two? When those two hours could save your life if you really DO need a doctor? If you want to spend more time with your family, these two hours aren’t the ones to lose.

“I don’t want to spend the money.”

It makes more sense to spend a little and save a lot than to save a little and spend a lot. If you think spending time with a doctor is expensive, try spending time in a hospital.

“Doctors don’t DO anything.”

When you see a barber, you get a haircut. When you see the dentist, your teeth get cleaned. But when you get a checkup, the doctor just gives you tests. It may seem like you don’t get anything, but you do. You get news and knowledge that can bring better health, if you act on it.

“I’ve got probe-a-phobia.”

You don’t need a prostate cancer exam until you’re 50. Even then, remember that your chances of survival are much better if it’s caught early. So, it’s worth the exam, and it’s only one small portion of a physical. Don’t let one test stop you from getting all the benefits of an annual physical.

“I’d rather tough it out.”

If pro athletes can play hurt and sacrifice themselves for the team, you ought to be able to suck it up, right? Wrong! The Game of Life is about staying healthy for a long time – a lifetime.

“My significant other has been nagging me to get a checkup. I’m a Rebel!”

OK, so you don’t want to give in, but isn’t it POSSIBLE you could be wrong? Give in on this one. See the doctor.

The risks of avoiding preventive care are real and can be devastating. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 10 leading killers of American men (regardless of age or ethnicity and in order) are:

Heart disease

Cancer

Unintentional injuries

Chronic lower respiratory diseases (such as COPD)

Stroke

Diabetes

Suicide

Alzheimer’s disease

Influenza and pneumonia

Chronic liver disease

Unlike the majority of women, who tend to seek medical care when even when they do not have symptoms, men often believe if you “feel fine,” there’s no reason to go to the doctor. It is important to note many can feel normal with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or abnormal blood sugar levels. Even when men don’t feel so great, they tend to wait for symptoms to go away on their own — like when they drive around aimlessly because asking for directions admits weakness!

Be aware, you do not need a “one-size-fits-all” physical.  Collaborate with your healthcare provider, and depending on your profile and lifestyle, decide which screenings, diagnostic tests, and immunizations are right for you. The timing and frequency should be based on your risk factors for developing a condition or disease, including family or personal history, age, ethnicity, and environmental exposure.

In honor of Father’s Day, dads and those who care for them, go to the HealthLynked.com to find a physician you really connect with….Spend a few moments building a healthier life by collaborating with physicians who care, and begin building a health record for yourself that will help you set records for living a full life.

From all of us here at HealthLynked, consider our Free profiles a great gift for becoming the best version of you!  We all wish you the very best today and every day!

 

 

9 Potential Health Benefits of Vinegar Supported by Science

As an ancient folk remedy, Apple cider vinegar  has been used over centuries for various household chores, as a preservative and in cooking.  Today, it is the most popular vinegar in the natural health community, which promotes many of its benefits.  A few find some support in research, including weight loss, reduced cholesterol, lower blood sugar levels and improved symptoms of diabetes.

Below are 9 health benefits of apple cider vinegar supported by scientific study.

1. Boasts Potent Biological Effects

Apple cider vinegar is made in a two-step process related to how alcohol is made.  In French, the word “vinegar” actually means “sour wine.”  The first step exposes crushed apples (or apple cider) to yeast, which ferment the sugars and turn them into alcohol.  In the second step, bacteria are added to the alcohol solution, further fermenting the alcohol turning it into acetic acid — the main active compound in vinegar.

9 Potential Health Benefits of Vinegar Supported by Science

Organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (like Bragg’s) also contains “mother” – strands of proteins, enzymes and friendly bacteria that give the product a murky appearance.  Some people believe the “mother” is responsible for most of the health benefits, although there are few published studies to support this.

Apple cider vinegar only contains about three calories per tablespoon, which is very low.  There are not many vitamins or minerals in it, but it does contain a small amount of potassium. Quality apple cider vinegar also contains some amino acids and antioxidants.

2. Kills Many Types of Harmful Bacteria

Vinegar can help kill pathogens, including bacteria.  It has traditionally been used for cleaning and disinfecting, treating nail fungus, lice, warts and ear infections.

Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, used vinegar for wound cleaning over two thousand years ago.  Vinegar has also been used as a food preservative, and studies show that it inhibits bacteria (like E. coli) from growing in food and spoiling it.  If you’re looking for a natural way to preserve your food, apple cider vinegar could be highly useful.

There have also been anecdotal reports of diluted apple cider vinegar helping with acne when applied to the skin, but there is not strong research to confirm this.  The main substance in vinegar, acetic acid, can kill harmful bacteria or prevent them from multiplying. It has a history of use as a disinfectant and natural preservative.

3. Lowers Blood Sugar Levels and Fights Diabetes

By far, the most successful application of vinegar to date is in patients with type 2 diabetes.  Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels, either because of insulin resistance or an inability to produce insulin.  Also, high blood sugar can also be a problem in people who don’t have diabetes. It is believed to be a major cause of aging and various chronic diseases.

Pretty much everyone should benefit from keeping their blood sugar levels in the normal range. The most effective (and healthiest) way to do that is to avoid refined carbs and sugar, but apple cider vinegar can also have a powerful effect.

Vinegar has been shown to have numerous benefits for blood sugar and insulin levels:

  • Improves insulin sensitivity during a high-carb meal by 19–34% and significantly lowers blood sugar and insulin responses.
  • Reduces blood sugar by 34% after eating 50 grams of white bread.
  • 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bedtime can reduce fasting blood sugar in the morning by 4%.
  • Numerous other studies in humans show that vinegar can improve insulin function and lower blood sugar levels after meals.9 Potential Health Benefits of Vinegar Supported by Science

Apple cider vinegar may also increase insulin sensitivity. Insulin is the hormone responsible for transporting sugar from the blood to the tissues where it can be used as fuel. Sustaining elevated levels of insulin can cause insulin resistance, which reduces its effectiveness and leads to high blood sugar and diabetes.  A study in Diabetes Care showed that vinegar ingestion helped significantly improve insulin sensitivity by up to 34 percent in those with either type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance. (1)

To keep blood sugar levels stable, try diluting one to two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in 8 ounces of water and consuming before meals. Additionally, be sure to moderate carbohydrate intake, increase your consumption of fiber and protein foods and get in plenty of regular physical activity to drop blood sugar levels even more.

For these reasons, vinegar can be useful for people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, or those who want to keep their blood sugar levels low for other reasons.  If you’re currently taking blood-sugar-lowering medications, check with your doctor before increasing your intake of any type of vinegar.

4. Helps You Lose Weight and Reduces Belly Fat

Surprisingly, studies also show that vinegar can help you lose weight.  Several human studies demonstrate vinegar can increase satiety, help you eat fewer calories and lead to actual pounds lost on the scale.  For example, when people take vinegar along with a high-carb meal, they get increased feelings of fullness and end up eating 200–275 fewer calories for the rest of the day.

9 Potential Health Benefits of Vinegar Supported by Science

A study in 175 people with obesity showed that daily apple cider vinegar consumption led to reduced belly fat and weight loss:

  • 15 mL (1 tablespoon): Lost 2.6 pounds, or 1.2 kilograms.
  • 30 mL (2 tablespoons): Lost 3.7 pounds, or 1.7 kilograms.

However, keep in mind that this study went on for 3 months, so the true effects on body weight seem to be rather modest.  Just adding or subtracting single foods or ingredients rarely has a noticeable effect on weight.  It’s an entire diet and improved lifestyle that matters;  you may need to combine several effective changes to see results.

Overall, it seems like apple cider vinegar is useful as a weight loss aid, mainly by promoting satiety and lowering blood sugar and insulin levels.  While it won’t work any miracles on its own, studies suggest vinegar can increase feelings of fullness and help people eat fewer calories, which leads to weight loss.

5. Lowers Cholesterol and Improves Heart Health

Cholesterol is a fat-like substance that can build up in the arteries, causing them to narrow and harden. High blood cholesterol puts a strain on your heart, forcing it to work harder to push blood throughout the body.

Heart disease is currently the world’s most common cause of premature death.  It is known that several biological factors are linked to either a decreased or increased risk of heart disease.  Several of these “risk factors” may be improved by vinegar consumption, but many of the supporting studies were done in animals.

These animal studies suggest that apple cider vinegar can lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with several other heart disease risk factors.  There are also some studies showing that vinegar reduces blood pressure in rats, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and kidney problems.

The only human evidence so far is an observational study from Harvard showing women who ate salad dressings with vinegar had a reduced risk of heart disease.  However, this type of study can only show an association – it cannot prove that the vinegar caused anything.

As mentioned above, human studies also show that apple cider vinegar can lower blood sugar levels, improve insulin sensitivity and help fight diabetes. These factors should also lead to reduced risk of heart disease.

Besides including a tablespoon or two of apple cider vinegar in your diet each day, other ways to lower cholesterol fast include minimizing your intake of sugar and refined carbohydrates, including a good variety of healthy fats in your diet and eating a few servings of fish per week.

6. May Have Protective Effects Against Cancer

Cancer is a terrible disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of cells.  There is a lot of hype online about the anti-cancer effects of apple cider vinegar.  In fact, numerous studies have shown that various types of vinegar can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors.  However, all of the studies on this were done in isolated cells in test tubes, or rats, which proves nothing about what happens in a living, breathing human.

That said, some observational studies in humans have shown that vinegar consumption is linked to decreased esophageal cancer in China, but increased bladder cancer in Serbia.  It is possible that consuming apple cider vinegar may help prevent cancer, but this needs to be researched more before any recommendations can be made.

7.  Improves Skin Health

Apple cider vinegar doesn’t just benefit your internal health; it has also been shown to treat acne and reduce scarring. Certain strains of bacteria often contribute to the development of acne. Vinegar is well-known for its antibacterial properties and has been shown to be effective against many strains of harmful bacteria.

Apple cider vinegar also contains specific components like acetic acid, lactic acid, succinic acid and citric acid, all of which have been shown to inhibit the growth of Propionibacterium acnes, the specific strain of bacteria responsible for causing acne.

These beneficial components may also reduce scarring. A study in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology showed that treating acne scars with lactic acid for three months led to improvements in the texture, pigmentation and appearance of treated skin as well as a lightening of scars.  Adding some probiotic foods into your diet, using healing masks and toners and keeping your skin well-moisturized are some other effective home remedies for acne as well.

8.  Reduces Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease. It forces the heart to work harder, causing the heart muscle to weaken and deteriorate over time.

Apple cider vinegar benefits your blood pressure levels, helping to keep your heart healthy and strong. An animal study in Japan showed that giving rats acetic acid, the main component in vinegar, resulted in reduced levels of blood pressure. Another animal study had similar findings, demonstrating that vinegar effectively blocked the actions of a specific enzyme that raises blood pressure.

Other natural ways to lower blood pressure include increasing your intake of magnesium and potassium, upping your fiber intake and swapping the salt and processed foods for whole foods.

9. Relieves Symptoms of Acid Reflux

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD or acid reflux, is a condition characterized by acid backflow from the stomach up into the esophagus, causing symptoms like heartburn, belching and nausea.  Acid reflux is often a result of having low levels of stomach acid. If this is the case for you, drinking apple cider vinegar may help provide relief from acid reflux symptoms by introducing more acid into the digestive tract to prevent acid backflow.

For best results, dilute one to two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in an 8-ounce glass of water and drink just before eating. Additionally, remember to follow an acid reflux diet rich in vegetables, healthy fats and fermented foods to slash symptoms even more.

Dosage and How to Use

The best way to incorporate apple cider vinegar into your diet is to use it in your cooking — for salad dressings, homemade mayonnaise and that sort of thing.

Some people also like to dilute it in water and drink it as a beverage. Common dosages range from 1–2 teaspoons (5–10 ml) to 1–2 tablespoons (15–30 ml) per day, mixed in a large glass of water.

It’s best to start with small doses and avoid taking large amounts – too much vinegar may have harmful side effects.  It is recommended to use organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar with the “mother.”

The Bottom Line

There are a number of likely over-inflated claims about apple cider vinegar.  Some say it can increase energy levels and deliver all sorts of beneficial effects on health.  Unfortunately, many of these claims are not supported by science.  Of course, absence of proof does not invalidate that something is happening, and anecdotes often end up becoming supported by science down the line.

Apple cider vinegar also has various other non-health related uses like hair conditioning, deoderant, dental care, pet use and as a cleaning agent (to name a few).  These can be highly useful for people who like to keep things as natural and chemical-free as possible.

From the little evidence available, it appears apple cider vinegar may be useful and is definitely a viable candidate for some experimentation if you’re interested and your physician agrees.  At the very least, apple cider vinegar seems to be safe as long as you don’t go overboard and take excessive amounts.

Precautions

While apple cider vinegar appears to be very healthy, it is not a “miracle” or a “cure-all” like so many seem to believe.  It does clearly have some important health benefits, especially in lowering blood sugar and aiding in weight control.  Still, it should not be viewed as a quick fix when it comes to your health.  Instead, it should be paired with a nutritious diet and healthy lifestyle for best possible results.

Although apple cider vinegar is healthy and safe for most people, consuming large amounts may lead to some negative effects on health. Apple cider vinegar side effects include erosion of tooth enamel, burning of the throat or skin and decreased levels of potassium.

Be sure to always dilute apple cider vinegar in water instead of drinking it straight to prevent negative side effects. You should also start with a low dose and work your way up to assess your tolerance, and always consult with a physician.

If you’re taking blood sugar medications, talk to your doctor before using apple cider vinegar. Because apple cider vinegar may help reduce blood sugar levels, you may need to modify your dosage of diabetes medications to prevent hypoglycemia symptoms.

To find the right physician to talk with you about the benefits of adding vinegar to your diet and improving your overall wellness, use HealthLynked.com today to truly take control of health.  Using HealthLynked, you can maintain all of your health information in one place, find and make appointments with medical professionals, and collaborate with physicians who care for you.

Ready to get Lynked?  Go to HealthLynked.com to sign up for free now!

 

Sources:

  1. Johnston CS, et al. Vinegar improves insulin sensitivity to a high-carbohydrate meal in subjects with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes.  Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):281-2.
  2. MedLine
  3. com

 

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12 Signs Your Gray Matter Needs a CheckUP!

My buddy had fallen off the radar.  After years of at least chatting on our birthdays and around the Army-Navy Game (Go NAVY!) and USNA homecoming, I wasn’t able to reach him and had not gotten a call from him the entire football season.  As the Chief Information Officer for a major medical center, he had taken a low profile on social media, and so had his spouse.  They were sometimes difficult to reach when they went dark.

Luckily, I knew I’d be traveling in his area, so I was not going to let too busy or too secretive get in the way of seeing him.  I went to the facility where he worked, which was more secure than most of the bases we’d served on in our Navy careers.  After finally getting his assistant on the phone, I was getting the sense there was something more to the runaround.  The last time we did actually speak, he told me he had not been feeling too great – headaches that wouldn’t go away and occasionally blurred vision.

I asked her to have someone – anyone – call me to let me know how to get hold of him after explaining how I’d known him so many years. I received a call from his wife about fifteen minutes later.  She told me how to get to his room, that she’d cleared me with security in the building where he was, and prepared me for what I would be walking into.

The funniest, sunniest man I knew was in a comma after surgery on a brain tumor.  The surgery had gone great.  It was the weakness he suffered after which caused him to fall and brought him, then me, to this room.

On this World Brain Tumor Day, and many days of the year, I lift up and hope to honor my dear friend.

WHAT IS A BRAIN TUMOR?

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain or central spine that can disrupt proper brain function. Doctors refer to a tumor based on where the tumor cells originated, and whether they are cancerous (malignant) or not (benign).

  • Benign:The least aggressive type of brain tumor is often called a benign brain tumor. They originate from cells within or surrounding the brain, do not contain cancer cells, grow slowly, and typically have clear borders that do not spread into other tissue.
  • Malignant:Malignant brain tumors contain cancer cells and often do not have clear borders. They are considered to be life threatening because they grow rapidly and invade surrounding brain tissue.
  • Primary:Tumors that start in cells of the brain are called primary brain tumors. Primary brain tumors may spread to other parts of the brain or to the spine, but rarely to other organs.
  • Metastatic:Metastatic or secondary brain tumors begin in another part of the body and then spread to the brain. These tumors are more common than primary brain tumors and are named by the location in which they begin.

There are over 120 types of brain and central nervous system tumors. Brain and spinal cord tumors are different for everyone. They form in different areas, develop from different cell lines, and may have different treatment options.

Causes

Brain tumors that begin in the brain

 Primary brain tumors originate in the brain itself or in tissues close to it, such as in the brain-covering membranes (meninges), cranial nerves, pituitary gland or pineal gland.

Primary brain tumors begin when normal cells acquire errors (mutations) in their DNA. These mutations allow cells to grow and divide at increased rates and to continue living when healthy cells would die. The result is a mass of abnormal cells, which forms a tumor.

In adults, primary brain tumors are much less common than are secondary brain tumors, in which cancer begins elsewhere and spreads to the brain.

Many types of primary brain tumors exist. Each gets its name from the type of cells involved. Examples include:

  • These tumors begin in the brain or spinal cord and include astrocytomas, ependymomas, glioblastomas, oligoastrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas.
  • A meningioma is a tumor that arises from the membranes that surround your brain and spinal cord (meninges). Most meningiomas are noncancerous.
  • Acoustic neuromas (schwannomas).These are benign tumors that develop on the nerves that control balance and hearing leading from your inner ear to your brain.
  • Pituitary adenomas.These are mostly benign tumors that develop in the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. These tumors can affect the pituitary hormones with effects throughout the body.
  • These are the most common cancerous brain tumors in children. A medulloblastoma starts in the lower back part of the brain and tends to spread through the spinal fluid. These tumors are less common in adults, but they do occur.
  • Germ cell tumors.Germ cell tumors may develop during childhood where the testicles or ovaries will form. But sometimes germ cell tumors affect other parts of the body, such as the brain.
  • These rare, noncancerous tumors start near the brain’s pituitary gland, which secretes hormones that control many body functions. As the craniopharyngioma slowly grows, it can affect the pituitary gland and other structures near the brain.

Tumors that begin elsewhere and spread to the brain

Secondary (metastatic) brain tumors are tumors that result from rogue cells that go awry  elsewhere in your body and then spread (metastasizes) to your brain.

Secondary brain tumors most often occur in people who have a history of cancer. But in rare cases, a metastatic brain tumor may be the first sign of cancer that began elsewhere in your body.

In adults, secondary brain tumors are far more common than are primary brain tumors.

Any cancer can spread to the brain, but common types include:

  • Breast cancer
  • Colon cancer
  • Kidney cancer
  • Lung cancer
  • Melanoma

Risk factors

In most people with primary brain tumors, the cause of the tumor is not clear, but doctors have identified some factors that may increase your risk of a brain tumor.

Risk factors include:

  • Exposure to radiation.People who have been exposed to a type of radiation called ionizing radiation have an increased risk of brain tumor. Examples of ionizing radiation include radiation therapy used to treat cancer and radiation exposure caused by atomic bombs or nuclear powered vessels.  My friend was a submariner, so this was likely his contributing environmental risk.
  • Family history of brain tumors.A small portion of brain tumors occur in people with a family history of brain tumors or a family history of genetic syndromes that increase the risk of brain tumors.

12 POTENTIAL Symptoms

There are times a person may have no symptoms when their brain tumor is discovered.  Brain tumor symptoms vary according to tumor type and location. These may include:

New onset or change in pattern of headaches

If you’re not the type to usually have headaches and suddenly find you are dealing with them regularly, it could be many things – including early signs of a brain tumor.

Headaches associated with brain tumors don’t respond to over-the-counter remedies the same way other headaches do. However, you shouldn’t panic if you’re having headaches: “Keep in mind that most headaches are unrelated to brain tumors,” according to WebMD.

Speech Challenges

The Cancer Treatment Centers of America note that depending on the location of the brain tumor, it can affect areas that are normally responsible for clear communication.

That being said, speech itself may become difficult for the affected person, or they may experience “language difficulties”. This typically means the person can’t find the right words to express something or is unable to comprehend what someone is telling them.

Hearing Loss

While the ability to choose the right words to be heard can be affected by a brain tumor, so can the ability to hear, according to the Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada. While the ear is obviously important for hearing, it’s the brain the ultimately processes sound, notes the source. That means your ear and its inner structures could be fine, but the pathways and receptors in your brain are not.

One type of tumor that can impact hearing is called an acoustic neuroma, which may affect one or both ears. Tests for this generally show hearing loss in high frequencies, as well as poor recognition of words, it adds. Tumors can affect a smaller area where auditory relay systems are, or by “mass effects” such as creating pressure or even causing the brain to move depending on the size of the tumor.

Weakness in One Side

You may experience weakness in 1-side of the body, affecting the arm and leg on that side. On top of that, you may become confused about which side of your body is left or right, which are all linked to a tumor in the frontal or parietal lobe of the brain.

Another symptom of this type of brain tumor is an “altered perception” of touch or pressure, it adds. Sources note this could affect your ability to feel pain or different temperatures.

Muscle Twitches

Tumors sometimes form on the membranes covering the brain and nearby spinal cord. It says the tumor pressing against these 2-essential areas can cause involuntary movements of muscles – these are called convulsions, which are also sometimes referred to as motor seizures, adds the source.

While this can present as full-blown seizures with loss of bodily function, it can also be in the form of single/multiple muscle twitches, jerks or spasms, known as myoclonic seizures.

Vision problems, such as blurred vision, double vision or loss of peripheral vision

Cancer Treatment Centers of America notes that a tumor located near the optical nerve could result in blurred or double vision, and some other types of tumors can actually result in abnormal eye movements.

The American Brain Tumor Association paints a slight less rosy picture when it comes to the relation of brain tumors and vision: the source notes you may develop blind spots, loss of peripheral vision (seeing out of the corner of your eyes), or sudden blindness – which could indicate pressure from the tumor on the brain, it adds. If you’re experiencing sudden blindness, seek medical assistance immediately.

Seizures

Brain tumors can also trigger seizures, which “might be the first clue that something unusual is happening in the brain,” according to the American Brain Tumor Association. It notes seizures are more common with particular types of brain tumors, such as slow-growing gliomas, meningiomas (affecting the membranes of the brain and spinal cord), and metastatic brain tumors (cancer that starts elsewhere and spreads to the brain).

Characteristics of tumor-related seizures include a sudden onset of the problem, loss of body function, arrested breathing (for 30-seconds or so) that could lead to a “dusky blue” skin color, an overall short episode of 2 or 3-minutes, and weakness or numbness afterwards.

Personality Changes

Family members and caregivers could notice a change in your behavior if you’re dealing with a brain tumor. CureToday.com explains that personality changes in a patient can put extra burden on those already dealing with the illness.

As the frontal lobe of the brain is the “command center” for personality, tumors in this area of the brain will have a more severe impact. However, other locations of tumors can cause hormonal imbalances and severe frustration for the patient, especially if their ability to speak has been impacted. “A brain tumor patient that has lost their speech might desperately want to tell a grandchild how much they love them, but not be able to get the words out,” Cure offers.

Depression

Along with personality changes that could involve risky behavior, a person’s mood may drop due to the presence of brain cancer.  In some cases, this may result in a misdiagnosis of a psychiatric problem, when in fact it’s a physical change in the brain region causing the depression or other unusual mood or behavior, it adds

Cognitive Decline

A host of problems with the brain’s ability to process information might be a result of a brain tumor. Cancer Treatment Centers of America notes brain cancer (tumors) can make it difficult for a patient to remember things, concentrate on a task, or communicate clearly.

A variety of the symptoms – such as being confused and not being able to think clearly – may be subtle or show up gradually. These could be early red flags to prompt your doctor to have a closer look at the root cause.

Trouble with Balance and Coordination

Cancer.net explains there could be some telltale signs of a brain tumor that show up in physical ways, whether from the cancer itself or the treatments. As the brain and spinal cord are part of the central nervous system, brain cancer patients can experience a variety of these unwanted side effects.

Aside from the cognitive decline already mentioned, brain tumor patients may find they have trouble with walking and balance, and they could experience vertigo, which is the sensation of the room spinning. Problems with coordination (e.g. something simple like tying your shoelaces) might also be impacted.

Fatigue/Lethargy

TheBrainTumorCharity.com based in the UK discusses tumor-related fatigue, noting it is “the most common side effect” of brain tumors and brain cancer. Those with non-cancerous brain tumors may also experience fatigue (defined as tiredness that’s not relieved by resting), it adds. You may also feel like your limbs are heavier and it’s generally tougher to move around.

This tumor-related fatigue can disrupt your sleep patterns and vary in intensity day-to-day or even during the same day, it adds. Other sources note fatigue is also a side effect of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy – so if the tumor itself isn’t causing you to feel endlessly tired, the treatment might be. 

Get Help Today

Whatever symptoms you have, make an appointment and discuss them fully with your physician so everyone has the most accurate information.  Though working at a renowned cancer center, my good friend waited a little too long to talk to someone.  Too busy and too secretive, right?

Diagnosing a brain tumor can be a complicated process and involve a number of specialists, depending on where you live or where you seek medical attention.  One of the factors of survival is early detection and treatment. A brain scan, most often an MRI, is the first step. A biopsy may be necessary, so a pathologist can be brought in to help identify the brain tumor type.

Whatever health concerns you have today, making sure you are connected to the right physicians and they have all of your most up to date information is what HealthLynked is all about.  It is the first of its kind social ecosystem designed to “Lynk” patients with their healthcare team in new ways to ensure they receive the best possible care and are restored to the best health possible.

Ready to get “Lynked”?  Go to HealthLynked.com, right now, and get signed up for free.  Your brain will thank you!

Sources:

MayoClinic.org

ABC2.org

ActiveBeat.com

Emedicinehealth.com

 

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12 Signs Your Gray Matter Needs a CheckUP!