How Infections Spread | Infection Control

A susceptible person is someone who is not vaccinated or otherwise immune, or a person with a weakened immune system who has a way for the germs to enter the body. For an infection to occur, germs must enter a susceptible person’s body and invade tissues, multiply, and cause a reaction.

Devices like IV catheters and surgical incisions can provide an entryway, whereas a healthy immune system helps fight infection.

When patients are sick and receive medical treatment in healthcare facilities, the following factors can increase their susceptibility to infection.

  • Patients in healthcare who have underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, cancer, and organ transplantation are at increased risk for infection because often these illnesses decrease the immune system’s ability to fight infection.
  • Certain medications used to treat medical conditions, such as antibiotics, steroids, and certain cancer fighting medications increase the risk of some types of infections.
  • Lifesaving medical treatments and procedures used in healthcare such as urinary catheters, tubes, and surgery increase the risk of infection by providing additional ways that germs can enter the body.

Recognizing the factors that increase patients’ susceptibility to infection allows providers to recognize risks and perform basic infection prevention measures to prevent infection from occurring.

Source link

3HP for Latent TB Infection Treatment | 2018 | Newsroom | NCHHSTP

 

June 28, 2018 – 3HP for Latent TB Infection Treatment

CDC released updated recommendations for use of once-weekly isoniazid-rifapentine for 12 weeks (3HP) for treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. The updated recommendations support expanded use of an effective, shorter, treatment regimen to reach even more people with latent TB infection. The 3HP regimen can help remove current barriers to latent TB treatment for both patients and providers.

Source link

What Is a Spleen and What Does it Do?

It’s that organ right behind the stomach and under the lungs, but honestly what does the spleen do? Can you live without it? Learn more: http://wb.md/2cCQMJj

Subscribe to WebMD here: https://www.youtube.com/user/WebMD

Follow WebMD here:
Website: http://webmd.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WebMD/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/webmd/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/WebMD
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/webmd/

Source by [author_name]

WebMD,health,anatomy,spleen,what is a spleen,what does the spleen do,stomach,organ,red blood cells,stomach organ,filter blood,can you live without your spleen,infection

 


About HealthLynked

Improving healthcare is the mission of HealthLynked. HealthLynked focuses on improving healthcare services for patients as well as physicians. Our technology shortens wait time with online scheduling of appointments, Real-time appointments by local providers and provides easy access to yours as well as your family’s updated medical records.

Appointments can be comfortably made online and providing your healthcare provider access to your medical files. The website also makes it possible to link together family members and provide access to critical information in case of an emergency

Download APP Now

Future of HealthCare