How to Take Your Baby’s Temperature

Find out which thermometer you should use to take your baby’s temperature (it depends on your little one’s age) and how to correctly use each type.

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Is it Lice or Super Lice?

Super lice? Sounds like a comic book character, but these pesky critters are the real deal. Here’s the difference between regular lice and super lice.

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How to Take Your Toddler’s Temperature

Wondering the best way to take your toddler’s temperature? You have a few options when your child is 1-3 years old. Learn more: http://wb.md/2d3USrA

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Positive Parenting | NIH News in Health

Building Healthy Relationships With Your Kids

Parents have an important job. Raising kids is both rewarding and challenging. You’re likely to get a lot of advice along the way, from doctors, family, friends, and even strangers. But every parent and child is unique. Being sensitive and responsive to your kids can help you build positive, healthy relationships together.

“Being a sensitive parent and responding to your kids cuts across all areas of parenting,” says Arizona State University’s Dr. Keith Crnic, a parent-child relationship expert. “What it means is recognizing what your child needs in the moment and providing that in an effective way.”

This can be especially critical for infants and toddlers, he adds. Strong emotional bonds often develop through sensitive, responsive, and consistent parenting in the first years of life. For instance, holding your baby lovingly and responding to their cries helps build strong bonds.

Building Bonds

Strong emotional bonds help children learn how to manage their own feelings and behaviors and develop self-confidence. They help create a safe base from which they can explore, learn, and relate to others.

Experts call this type of strong connection between children and their caregivers “secure attachment.” Securely attached children are more likely to be able to cope with challenges like poverty, family instability, parental stress, and depression.

A recent analysis shows that about 6 out of 10 children in the U.S. develop secure attachments to their parents. The 4 out of 10 kids who lack such bonds may avoid their parents when they are upset or resist their parents if they cause them more distress. Studies suggest that this can make kids more prone to serious behavior problems. Researchers have been testing programs to help parents develop behaviors that encourage secure attachment.

Being Available

Modern life is full of things that can influence your ability to be sensitive and responsive to your child. These include competing priorities, extra work, lack of sleep, and things like mobile devices. Some experts are concerned about the effects that distracted parenting may have on emotional bonding and children’s language development, social interaction, and safety.

If parents are inconsistently available, kids can get distressed and feel hurt, rejected, or ignored. They may have more emotional outbursts and feel alone. They may even stop trying to compete for their parents’ attention and start to lose emotional connections to their parents.

“There are times when kids really do need your attention and want your recognition,” Crnic explains. Parents need to communicate that their kids are valuable and important, and children need to know that parents care what they’re doing, he says.

It can be tough to respond with sensitivity during tantrums, arguments, or other challenging times with your kids. “If parents respond by being irritable or aggressive themselves, children can mimic that behavior, and a negative cycle then continues to escalate,” explains Dr. Carol Metzler, who studies parenting at the Oregon Research Institute.

According to Crnic, kids start to regulate their own emotions and behavior around age 3. Up until then, they depend more on you to help them regulate their emotions, whether to calm them or help get them excited.

“They’re watching you to see how you do it and listening to how you talk to them about it,” he explains. “Parents need to be good self-regulators. You’re not only trying to regulate your own emotions in the moment, but helping your child learn to manage their emotions and behavior.”

As kids become better at managing their feelings and behavior, it’s important to help them develop coping skills, like active problem solving. Such skills can help them feel confident in handling what comes their way.

“When parents engage positively with their children, teaching them the behaviors and skills that they need to cope with the world, children learn to follow rules and regulate their own feelings,” Metzler says.

“As parents, we try really hard to protect our kids from the experience of bad things,” Crnic explains. “But if you protect them all the time and they are not in situations where they deal with difficult or adverse circumstances, they aren’t able to develop healthy coping skills.”

He encourages you to allow your kids to have more of those experiences and then help them learn how to solve the problems that emerge. Talk through the situation and their feelings. Then work with them to find solutions to put into practice.

Meeting Needs

As children grow up, it’s important to remember that giving them what they need doesn’t mean giving them everything they want. “These two things are very different,” Crnic explains. “Really hone in on exactly what’s going on with your kid in the moment. This is an incredibly important parenting skill and it’s linked to so many great outcomes for kids.”

Think about where a child is in life and what skills they need to learn at that time. Perhaps they need help managing emotions, learning how to behave in a certain situation, thinking through a new task, or relating to friends.

“You want to help kids become confident,” Crnic says. “You don’t want to aim too high where they can’t get there or too low where they have already mastered the skill.” Another way to boost confidence while strengthening your relationship is to let your kid take the lead.

“Make some time to spend with your child that isn’t highly directive, where your child leads the play,” advises Dr. John Bates, who studies children’s behavior problems at Indiana University Bloomington. “Kids come to expect it and they love it, and it really improves the relationship.”

Bates also encourages parents to focus on their child’s actual needs instead of sticking to any specific parenting principles. It’s never too late to start building a healthier, more positive relationship with your child, even if things have gotten strained and stressful.

“Most importantly, make sure that your child knows that you love them and are on their side,” Metzler says. “For older children, let them know that you are genuinely committed to building a stronger relationship with them and helping them be successful.”

By being a sensitive and responsive parent, you can help set your kids on a positive path, teach them self-control, reduce the likelihood of troublesome behaviors, and build a warm, caring parent-child relationship.

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Can You Spot a Person Drowning?

Are you sure you’d know when a child was in distress in the water? Here’s a test: See if you can find the person in this video who’s drowning before the lifeguard does. Plus, get some tips on how to keep your kids safe while swimming.

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“How Do You Feel?” Teaching Emotional IQ in School

The latest tool in schools, Social Emotional Learning, helps teens manage their emotions and keep their stress in check – and it’s gaining traction across the country.

With numerous programs implemented in thousands of schools, measuring success is tricky, and SEL has mixed reviews. Yet there is mounting evidence that the right program, properly integrated, yields academic rewards. Congress has even allowed funding for SEL in the new education law.

To learn more about teens and stress, see our extensive special report with Soledad O’Brien: http://wb.md/1SNUDwb

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A Heavy Load: Teens and Homework Stress

Teens on average have more than 3 hours of homework a night. That doesn’t leave a lot of time for after-school fun or even sleep. Now experts are questioning whether the amount of homework is leading to harmful levels of stress in teens.

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Crisis Help: Just a Text Away

Crisis text line, or CTL, is the first national 24/7 intervention hotline exclusively by text messaging. It offers anonymity, and it’s as easy as 741-741.

The Crisis Text Hotline is helping teens deal with serious issues like depression, suicidal thoughts, and self-harm. 40,000 text messages, the majority from teenagers, are exchanged each day with crisis counselors around the country. That’s more than 11 million messages since CTL started in 2013.

To learn more about teens and stress, see our extensive special report with Soledad O’Brien: http://wb.md/1SNUDwb

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About HealthLynked

Improving healthcare is the mission of HealthLynked. HealthLynked focuses on improving healthcare services for patients as well as physicians. Our technology shortens wait time with online scheduling of appointments, Real-time appointments by local providers and provides easy access to yours as well as your family’s updated medical records.

Appointments can be comfortably made online and providing your healthcare provider access to your medical files. The website also makes it possible to link together family members and provide access to critical information in case of an emergency

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Teen Suicide Prevention

In this video created by Mayo Clinic, teens describe common signs that a teen is considering suicide and provide encouragement for communicating directly and immediately for support and safety. It also Includes suggestions for what to say to a teen who may be at risk for suicide and ways to keep them safe. Things can get better.

For more information-
Call: 1-800-273-TALK, 1-800-273-8255
Visit: http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

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About HealthLynked

Improving healthcare is the mission of HealthLynked. HealthLynked focuses on improving healthcare services for patients as well as physicians. Our technology shortens wait time with online scheduling of appointments, Real-time appointments by local providers and provides easy access to yours as well as your family’s updated medical records.

Appointments can be comfortably made online and providing your healthcare provider access to your medical files. The website also makes it possible to link together family members and provide access to critical information in case of an emergency

Download APP Now

Future of HealthCare